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Wednesday, November 7
 

8:15am

Opening Remarks
Wednesday November 7, 2018 8:15am - 8:30am
Delta Ottawa, International Ballroom

8:30am

Plenary Session - How can better federal-provincial collaboration strengthen Canada’s Research ecosystem?
Panel Organizer: Friends of Canadian Institutes of Health Research
Keynote:  Dr. David Naylor (2018 Friesen Prizewinner) – “Inter-Jurisdictional Synergy in the Canadian Research Realm: Time for Action”

The 2017 report of the Fundamental Science Review primarily addressed the funding, organization, and oversight of federal support for extramural research.  However, a number of observations were made about the interplay of federal and provincial/territorial support for research, innovation, and talent development:  
  • Very limited Federal Provincial Territorial (FPT) interaction and shared strategizing among senior officials on the science and innovation files 
  • Obvious imbalance of financial support for research across Ottawa, the provinces, and institutions
  • Specific friction points: e.g. sharing of F&A (indirect) costs,  federal programs requiring for PT match funding without collaborative adjudication 
  • Weak alignment on shared challenges such as research infrastructure/infostructure 
  • Absence of a shared vision and national action plan for developing research-intensive talent

The panel will discuss FPT collaboration in research, and consider how improvements could be effected not only by governments, but also by institutions, non-government funders, advocacy groups, and industry partners.  



Moderators
avatar for Dr. Gilles Patry

Dr. Gilles Patry

Executive Director, U15
On October 1, 2017, Dr. Gilles G. Patry was appointed Executive Director of the U15 Group of Canadian Research Universities.  Following a long and distinguished career as a consultant, a researcher, and a university administrator, Dr. Patry brings to the U15 a wealth of experience... Read More →
avatar for André Picard

André Picard

Health Columnist, Globe and Mail
André Picard is a health reporter and columnist at The Globe and Mail, where he has been a staff writer since 1987. He is also the author of five bestselling books.André has received much acclaim for his writing. He is an eight-time nominee for the National Newspaper Awards, Canada's... Read More →

Speakers
avatar for Krista Connell

Krista Connell

Chief Executive Officer, Nova Scotia Health Research Foundation
Krista is responsible for providing the leadership and professional guidance necessary for the NSHRF to attain its mandate of improving the health of Nova Scotians through health research.Krista works collaboratively with the NSHRF Board of Directors and its many stakeholders to support... Read More →
avatar for Dr. Janet Rossant, PHD FRS FRSC

Dr. Janet Rossant, PHD FRS FRSC

President and Scientific Director, Gairdner Foundation
Dr. Janet Rossant, SickKids Chief of Research and a world-renowned expert in developmental biology, is the definition of a trailblazer. Widely known for her studies of the genes that control embryonic development in the mouse, Rossant has pioneered techniques for following cell fate... Read More →
avatar for Marc LePage

Marc LePage

President and CEO, Genome Canada
Marc LePage is President and CEO of Genome Canada.  Before assuming this role in January 2016, he served as President and CEO of Génome Québec since December 2011, where he led a major increase in research activity and enhanced focus on the development of genomic applications within... Read More →
avatar for Dr. David Naylor

Dr. David Naylor

2018 Friesen Prizewinner; Professor of Medicine and President Emeritus at the University of Toronto
David Naylor is a Professor of Medicine and President Emeritus at the University of Toronto. He earned his MD at the University of Toronto (1978) and DPhil as a Rhodes Scholar at the University of Oxford (1983), before undertaking specialty training in internal medicine at Western... Read More →
avatar for Dr. Mona Nemer

Dr. Mona Nemer

Chief Science Advisor, Government of Canada
Dr. Mona Nemer is the Chief Science Advisor to Canada’s Prime Minister and Minister of Science. Her mandate is to provide advice on issues related to science and government policies that support it. This includes advising on ways to ensure that science is considered in policy decisions... Read More →
avatar for Dr. Michael J. Strong

Dr. Michael J. Strong

President, Canadian Institutes of Health Research
Dr. Michael J. Strong is Dean of the Schulich School of Medicine & Dentistry and Distinguished University Professor at Western University. He also holds the Arthur J. Hudson Chair in ALS Research. He undertook his undergraduate training in biochemistry and medicine at Queens University... Read More →


Wednesday November 7, 2018 8:30am - 10:00am
Delta Ottawa, International Ballroom

10:00am

Coffee Break
Wednesday November 7, 2018 10:00am - 10:30am
Delta Ottawa, International Ballroom

10:30am

(90 min) Should regulators define their risk tolerances?: A debate
Organized by: Canadian Food Inspection Agency, Alyssa Daku

Setting risk tolerance is considered essential for governmental departments, agencies and private sector entities facing resource constraints. Without an ability to eliminate every risk, organizations must, so the argument runs, distinguish levels of risk that cannot be tolerated from those that can be. Yet, regulators with mandates to protect public health and safety have often struggled to concretely define levels of risk they would be willing to tolerate, as several reports from the Auditor General of Canada have highlighted. Establishing a specific risk tolerance sets a benchmark against which an organization’s own performance can be judged, increasing transparency and helping to make risk management more targeted and deliberate. At the same time, declaring a risk tolerance level may create legal liabilities or implicate trade obligations. Moreover, many public health risks are inherently dynamic and complex, and keeping risks to tolerable levels may become difficult as the internal and external risk environments evolve. Finally, admitting a level of risk is tolerable may clash with a public expectation that no risks to human health are tolerable.

In light of these difficulties, risk tolerances are often left vague or undefined. But should they be? Should regulators declare their tolerable levels of risk? Or are the concerns with defining risk tolerance simply too great to make defining risk tolerance worthwhile? Speaking directly to this question, the proposed debate centers on the following motion: “Be it resolved that regulators can and must set concrete, measurable risk tolerances.” Moderated by Alyssa Daku, Chief Data and Risk Executive at the Canadian Food Inspection Agency, the panel will bring together a diverse array of panelists from Canadian federal agencies, departments, academia and risk management consulting – who will vigorously argue for both sides of the issue.


Moderators
avatar for Alyssa Daku

Alyssa Daku

Chief Data and Risk Executive, Canadian Food Inspection Agency
Alyssa is a strategy and risk leader with significant experience in the health sector and other areas of government as it relates to corporate strategy, risk management, compliance and analytics. Alyssa joined the Canadian Food Inspection Agency (CFIA) in October 2016 to lead its... Read More →

Speakers
avatar for Pierre Bilodeau

Pierre Bilodeau

Executive Director, Plant Health Science Directorate, Canadian Food Inspection Agency
In his current position, Dr. Bilodeau is responsible for plant health science leadership in protecting Canada's plant resource base. His Directorate provides a valued source of scientific knowledge, analysis, risk assessment, and advice for stakeholders to support policy making, program... Read More →
avatar for Greg Paoli

Greg Paoli

Principal Risk Scientist, COO, Risk Sciences International
Greg Paoli serves as Principal Risk Scientist and Chief Operating Officer at RiskSciences International. He has been providing advice to regulatory agencies andregulated industry in Canada, the United States and at the international level for 25years. He holds a Bachelor’s and Master’s... Read More →
avatar for Liane Sauer

Liane Sauer

Director General, Strategic Planning,, Canadian Nuclear Safety Commission
Liane Sauer is the Director General (DG), Strategic Planning with the Canadian Nuclear Safety Commission and is responsible for strategic policy, Indigenous Consultations, international, research, evaluation, and planning and performance.  Prior to this, Ms. Sauer was the DG, Corporate... Read More →
avatar for Robert Wiersma

Robert Wiersma

Manager, Public Safety Risk Management, Technical Standards and Safety Authority, Ontario
Robert Wiersma is the Manager of the Public Safety Risk Management at the Technical Standards and Safety Authority in Ontario, Canada. He and his team seek to lead or conform to best practices in safety risk management and risk-informed decision making. Robert has experience understanding... Read More →


Wednesday November 7, 2018 10:30am - 12:00pm
Delta Hotel - Richelieu

10:30am

(90 min) Improvisation for Science Communication / Improvisation dans les communications scientifiques
Organized by:  LitScientist, Alan Shapiro 

Adapting the message to the audience is the single most important skill in communicating science effectively. Typically, scientists and researchers are trained to prepare presentations for colleagues; using the same approach for wider audiences including policymakers, funders, and the public can significantly limit the effectiveness of knowledge mobilization and community engagement efforts. Improvisation offers a wealth of tools and strategies for enhancing presentations and promoting audience engagement. Unlike traditional public speaking approaches, improvisation also supports researchers in responding to unexpected factors, such as challenging questions and unpredictable audiences. In this workshop, participants will work through interactive exercises to develop their communication skills. The workshop centres on individual and group work, and is designed to bring value to participants from both science and policy organizations. The workshop is geared to push participants outside their comfort zones and share concrete strategies that participants can apply for themselves and share within their institutions.

Moderators
avatar for Mitchell Beer

Mitchell Beer

President of Smarter Shift; Publisher of The Energy Mix
Mitchell Beer is President of Ottawa-based Smarter Shift and Publisher of The Energy Mix a thrice-weekly e-digest on climate change, energy, and post-carbon solutions. He’s also a student at Ottawa’s Improv Embassy and proud member of the Darling Mob Bosses improv team, and declares that improv classes and practices are always the best part of his week. He’s wo... Read More →
avatar for Nikki Berreth

Nikki Berreth

Co-founder, Science Slam; Owner, STEAM Communication
Nikki Berreth is a science communicator and educator living in Vancouver. With a background in science and fine arts as well as formal training in Science Communication, she's always looking for new ways to relay both scientific and technical knowledge to her intended audience. Leveraging... Read More →
avatar for Alan Shapiro

Alan Shapiro

Co-founder and Director of Science Slam Canada, Science Communication Specialist with LitScience
Alan Shapiro is a Vancouver-based environmental professional and science communicator with aparticular interest in engaging the public and policymakers on environmental and water issues. He is Co-founder and Director of Science Slam Canada, a non-profit organization that runs community... Read More →

Speakers
avatar for Dr. Jeff Dunn

Dr. Jeff Dunn

Professor, Department of Radiology, University of Calgary; Graduate Program Director, Cumming School of Medicine
Dr. Jeff Dunn is a Professor of Radiology with a focus on medical imaging and MRI. He is a graduateprogram director in the Cumming School of Medicine and has a broad interest in science communicationHis research has taken him from a PhD in Zoology at the University of British Columbia... Read More →
avatar for Dr. Monica Granados

Dr. Monica Granados

FQRNT and Wildlife Conservation Society Canada Postdoctoral Fellow
Dr. Monica Granados is a scientist, science communicator and champion of open science. As a FQRNTand Wildlife Conservation Society Canada postdoctoral fellow, she uses food web theory to monitorchanges in freshwater systems and provide tangible recommendations to decision makers and... Read More →
avatar for María Cortés Puch

María Cortés Puch

Head, National and Regional Networks’ Program for the UN Sustainable Development Solutions Network
María Cortés Puch is the Head of the National and Regional Networks’ Program for the UN SustainableDevelopment Solutions Network (SDSN). Prior to joining the SDSN, she worked for UNESCO in theScience Policy and Sustainable Development Division. Previously, she coordinated the... Read More →


Wednesday November 7, 2018 10:30am - 12:00pm
Delta Hotel - Joliet-Frontenac

10:30am

(90 min) Incorporating indigenous ways of knowing into applied research / Intégration de façons autochtones de savoir à la recherche appliquée
Organized by: Colleges and Institutes Canada, Anna Toneguzzo

Indigenous ways of knowing – how First Nations, Métis and Inuit peoples relate to the world around them, through community practices, ritual and relations – have traditionally not been integrated into academic research. This valuable expertise is often overlooked. Recognising this gap, colleges and institutes across Canada are developing partnerships with First Nations, Métis and Inuit communities to advance applied research on some of the most scientifically pressing issues of our time, which results in social innovation in sectors as diverse as food security, climate change and governance. Applied research undertaken by colleges and institutes is demand- driven, based on local and regional community needs. This is important in urban areas, but particularly in rural, remote and northern areas where colleges are key providers of training, work- integrated learning opportunities and applied research. A key characteristic of applied research is to partner with communities to understand and define the problem that needs to be solved and to then design adequate, applicable and relevant solutions. Colleges and institutes, with their expertise in applied research, training and strong employer connections, are able to draw upon their resources, infrastructure and laboratories to support innovation by, for and with First Nations, Métis and Inuit communities. This panel will focus on their experience, lessons learned and the way forward on applied research with First Nations, Métis and Inuit communities, while also taking into account how these communities can develop and engage in their own research initiatives.



Moderators
avatar for Ursula Gobel

Ursula Gobel

Associate Vice-President, Future Challenges, Social Sciences and Humanities Research Council
Ursula Gobel was appointed associate vice-president, future challenges, at SSHRC in April 2014. In her role, she collaborates with the research community and partners across the public, private and not-for-profit sectors to advance the social sciences and humanities contributions... Read More →
avatar for Manon Tremblay

Manon Tremblay

Director, Indigenous Research, Social Sciences and Humanities Research Council
Manon Tremblay is a member of the Muskeg Lake Cree Nation.  She is the Director, Indigenous Research at the Social Sciences and Humanities Research Council where she leads the initiative to build Indigenous research capacity.  Prior to that, she was the Senior Project Leader for... Read More →

Speakers
avatar for Bronwyn Hancock

Bronwyn Hancock

Associate Vice President Research Development, Yukon College
Bronwyn Hancock is the Associate Vice President Research Development for Yukon College, soon to be Yukon University. She is responsible for the planning, development and implementation of research at Yukon College, and for the development of positive relationships with the broader... Read More →
avatar for Émilie Parent

Émilie Parent

PhD Candidate, Université de Montréal
Émilie Parent is completing her Ph. D. in anthropology at the Université de Montréal and worksas a research assistant at the Cégep de Victoriaville’s Centre d’innovation sociale en agriculture(CISA).Specifically, she’s responsible for Indigenous projects at CISA and currently... Read More →
avatar for Pitseolak Pfeifer

Pitseolak Pfeifer

MA Student, Northern Studies, Carleton University
Born and raised in Iqaluit, Pitseolak is currently building on over 25 years of Inuit advocacy inhis M.A. in Northern Studies at Carleton University. His research interests lie at the intersectionof sustainable Northern community development, Indigenous epistemologies, and socio-culturaland... Read More →
avatar for Dr. Krista Robson

Dr. Krista Robson

Chair of the Research Ethics Board and Professor, Red Deer College
Dr. Krista Robson, Chair of the Research Ethics Board at Red Deer College, received a SSHRC Knowledge Synthesis Grant in 2016-2017 to investigate how the OCAP approach could be applied to college research in Central Alberta. (OCAP: "ownership, control, access, and possession" approach... Read More →
avatar for Gabriel Snowboy

Gabriel Snowboy

President, Nihtaauchin Chisasibi Center of Sustainability
Gabriel Snowboy is from the Cree Nation of Chisasibi, located near the shores of the James Bay, northern Quebec. Gabriel spent most his career helping to make the community a better place, either by building houses or by community-based projects that benefit the youth and whole community... Read More →


Wednesday November 7, 2018 10:30am - 12:00pm
Delta Ottawa - Chaudière

10:30am

(90 min)The social implications of emerging technologies: Are the most important questions the least studied? / Les répercussions sociales des technologies émergentes : les questions les plus importantes sont-elles les dernières à faire l'objet d'une étud
Organized by: Federation for the Humanities and Social Sciences, Peter Severinson

Rapid development of transformative new technologies – such as social media, artificial intelligence, and new health technologies – is creating important opportunities and challenges for governments, businesses, the research community and society at large. Too often, however, the social implications of such developments are overlooked.

Emerging technologies bring with them important new challenges. In recent years we have learned that our reliance on social media has created new risks to our democracies, with partisans and foreign actors able to rapidly spread falsehoods that exploit social divisions and erode public trust. The rapid development of artificial intelligence is raising questions about whether a new wave of automation threatens to dramatically reduce human jobs and accelerate inequality. Development in the medical sciences continually challenge historic social conventions and ethical norms.

We need to better understand how society is affected by emerging technologies in part to address the risks but also to help us unlock the potential benefits: to train workers able to make the best use of new capabilities, to make smart decision about how to employ new technology to address society’s most pressing problems, and to ensure the benefits of new technologies are effectively shared throughout our diverse society.

In this session we will explore whether the Canadian policy and research community is doing enough to understand and address the social implications of new technologies. We will consider how multidisciplinary approaches can help us address multiple dimensions of technological change and better understand the roles of diverse actors, including the natural scientist, the philosopher, the engineer, the behavioural scientist, the historian and the policy maker.

We will also explore the skills and knowledge needed to achieve the full potential of new technologies and to avoid the dangers, including scientific literacy, digital competency, creativity, openness, cultural awareness and sound ethical foundations. Finally, this event will engage the audience in a discussion about which new emerging technologies demand increased attention from the research and policy community and how we can work together to addressing their social implications.


Moderators
avatar for Sonia Vani

Sonia Vani

Director, Member Engagement and Communications, Federation for the Humanities and Social Sciences
Sonia Vani is a bilingual communications strategist, digital content producer, and a team leader.Over the past twenty years, she has applied her skills in leadership, storytelling, communications planning and strategic positioning to the advancement of education, culture, civic responsibility... Read More →

Speakers
avatar for Eric M. Meslin, Ph.D., FCAHS

Eric M. Meslin, Ph.D., FCAHS

President and CEO, Council of Canadian Academies
Eric M. Meslin is President and CEO of the Council of Canadian Academies (CCA). He joined the CCA inFebruary, 2016, bringing with him more than 25 years of experience in science policy in both universityand government settings.Dr. Meslin came to the CCA from Indiana University (IU... Read More →
avatar for Jaigris Hodson

Jaigris Hodson

Assistant Professor of Interdisciplinary Studies, Royal Roads University
Dr. Jaigris Hodson is Assistant Professor of Interdisciplinary Studies at Royal Roads University in BC. Her research specializes in understanding how people interact with digital technologies, such as social media, and the content that is produced and shared using those technologies... Read More →
avatar for Dominic Martin

Dominic Martin

Professor, École des sciences de la Gestion of the Université du Québec à Montréal
I am a professor of ethics at the École des sciences de la Gestion of the Université du Québec à Montréal. My current research and teaching are the broad areas of business ethics, ethics and economics, and  political philosophy. My work combines approaches from ethics, contemporary... Read More →


Wednesday November 7, 2018 10:30am - 12:00pm
Delta Ottawa, International Ballroom

10:30am

(90 mins) Towards a Canadian Life Sciences Supercluster / Vers un suramoncellement de sciences de la vie canadiennes
Organized by: The Centre for Drug Research and Development, Barry Gee

Canada has a proud history of international leadership in health research, and in supporting innovation in the global life sciences industry. Despite constituting less than 0.5% of the world population, Canadians produce 5% of the world’s research publications, with a citation rate that ranks amongst the top 6 nations worldwide. However, Canada doesn’t full take advantage of this competitive advantage by translating it into a leading life sciences industry: The winners of the Canadian federal government’s 2018 ‘Supercluster’ funding initiative represented a multitude of industries encompassing digital technologies, oceans, mining, artificial intelligence, smart agri-food, and advanced manufacturing. Jarringly, no life sciences proposals were ultimately supported.

This session will debate the government's decision, and discuss how we can tap into the life sciences sector’s potential to contribute immensely to Canada’s economy and transform into the next Canadian supercluster. Our panelists will share perspectives on two salient topics: (i) the means by which the public and private sectors can best come together to support the growth of Canada's health sciences ecosystem, and (ii) strategies for the federal government to establish comprehensive public policy and work with the private sector to support basic research, build a robust translational and commercialization pathway, and ultimately attract increased venture capital investment to Canada such that we can scale Canadian SMEs, and establish global Canadian anchors.

Moderators
avatar for Gordon McCauley

Gordon McCauley

President and CEO, The Centre for Drug Research and Development
Gordon McCauley was appointed President and CEO of CDRD in 2017 after serving on the Board for four years. Mr. McCauley is an accomplished life science investor and executive. He has served as President & CEO of Viable Healthworks Corp., a national healthcare service business; President... Read More →

Speakers
avatar for Dr. Raphael (Rafi) Hofstein

Dr. Raphael (Rafi) Hofstein

President and CEO, MaRS Innovation
Dr. Raphael Hofstein, also known as Rafi, Ph.D. has been the Chief Executive Officer and President of MaRS Innovation since June 2009.Dr. Hofstein joined MaRS Innovation from Israel, where he held the position of President and CEO of Hadasit Ltd., the technology transfer company of... Read More →
CM

Cate McCready

Vice President, External Affairs, BIOTECanada
With fifteen years of practical experience in the field of communications and public affairs Cate McCready joined BIOTECanada in November of 2001 and currently serves in the role of Vice President, External Affairs.Her current role with BIOTECanada encompasses the development of national... Read More →
avatar for Dr. Stéphanie Michaud

Dr. Stéphanie Michaud

President & Chief Executive Officer, BioCanRx
Dr. Stéphanie Michaud is the President and CEO of BioCanRx, a not-for-profit that seeks to accelerate the delivery of innovative immunotherapies from the bench to the bedside. In this position, Stéphanie is responsible for running all facets of the organization. She brings more... Read More →
avatar for Karimah Es Sabar

Karimah Es Sabar

CEO and Partner, Quark Venture Inc.
A highly-recognized Canadian life sciences leader with broad global experience, Karimah Es Sabar has had a successful career spanning multi-national pharmaceutical/biotechnology companies, startups, not-for-profit organizations and venture investment firm. She has provided leadership... Read More →


Wednesday November 7, 2018 10:30am - 12:00pm
Delta Ottawa - Capitale

12:45pm

Luncheon Session - AGE-WELL 2020: Charting the Future of Technology and Aging Research in Canada - Sponsored by
The AGE-WELL Network of Centres of Excellence is leading the way in developing technologies, services, policies and practices that improve the lives of older adults and caregivers. Building on its successes to date, AGE-WELL has launched a major renewal initiative that will set the research and innovation agenda in the technology and aging field in Canada from 2020-2025. AGE-WELL has identified eight key “Challenge Areas” through which it will drive innovation in the sector, influence policy and practice and invest in R&D. The Challenge Areas were generated through a review of Canadian and international policy priorities related to older adults and validated through an extensive stakeholder review process. Join us to learn how we can tackle these important challenges together in order to improve the lives of older Canadians and their caregivers, today and in the future.

Speakers
avatar for Mimi Lowi-Young, MHA

Mimi Lowi-Young, MHA

Chair, Board of Directors, AGE-WELL NCE Inc.
Mimi has more than 35 years experience as an Executive Health Care Leader, with expertise spanning the acute care sector, continuing care sector, and community health and health charities. She has also served as a health systems strategic advisor.Mimi joined the Alzheimer Society... Read More →
avatar for Alex Mihailidis, PhD PEng

Alex Mihailidis, PhD PEng

Scientific Director and CEO, AGE-WELL NCE Inc.
Alex Mihailidis, Ph.D., P.Eng., is the Barbara G. Stymiest Research Chair in Rehabilitation Technology at the University of Toronto and Toronto Rehab Institute.  He is also the Scientific Director of the AGE-WELL Network of Centres of Excellence, which focuses on the development... Read More →


Wednesday November 7, 2018 12:45pm - 1:30pm
Delta Ottawa, International Ballroom

1:30pm

(45 min) The Dementia Challenge: Facing the Rising Tide / Le défi posé par la démence : faire face au flot croissant
Organized by: Canadian Academy of Health Sciences, Eleanor Fast

Canada’s aging population and the increasing prevalence of Alzheimer’s disease and other dementias pose a significant challenge for Canadian families and their caregivers, and more broadly, for the health care system.

Recognizing the importance of developing and implementing an effective strategy to address this challenge, the Minister of Health of Canada, through the Public Health Agency of Canada, asked the Canadian Academy of Health Sciences (CAHS) to provide an evidence-informed and authoritative assessment on the state of knowledge to help advance federal priorities under the National Strategy for Alzheimer’s Disease and Other Dementias Act.

To address the charge, the CAHS assembled a multidisciplinary, multi-sectoral panel with a range of expertise, experience, and demonstrated leadership in this domain. The panel’s report will assess the evidence‐based and emerging practices, actions, and programs in jurisdictions within Canada and internationally that improve the care and the lives of people living with dementia and their caregivers.

This session at CSPC will provide attendees with an overview of the panel’s approach to providing meaningful input in a complex multi-jurisdictional policy environment.



Moderators
avatar for Howard Bergman, MD, FCFP, FRCPC, FCAHS

Howard Bergman, MD, FCFP, FRCPC, FCAHS

Chair, Panel for the Assessment of Evidence and Best Practices for the development of a Canadian Dementia Strategy, Canadian Academy of Health Sciences (CAHS)
Howard Bergman is Chair of the Department of Family Medicine and Professor of Family Medicine, Medicine, and Oncology at McGill University where he was the first Dr. Joseph Kaufmann Professor of Geriatric Medicine from 2001-2015. He is Special Advisor (International) to the Dean of... Read More →

Speakers
avatar for Carrie McAiney, PhD

Carrie McAiney, PhD

Associate Professor, School of Public Health and Health Systems, University of Waterloo
Carrie McAiney is an Associate Professor in the School of Public Health and Health Systems at the University of Waterloo and the UW-Schlegel Research Chair in Dementia. As a health services researcher, Carrie works collaboratively with organizations, providers, persons living with... Read More →
avatar for Isabelle Vedel, MD, PhD

Isabelle Vedel, MD, PhD

Assistant Professor, Department of Family Medicine, McGill University
Isabelle Vedel is a Public health physician and Assistant Professor in the Department of Family Medicine at McGill University. Dr. Vedel conducts health services research in primary healthcare services for older patients with chronic diseases. Specifically, she is conducting studies... Read More →


Wednesday November 7, 2018 1:30pm - 2:15pm
Delta Ottawa - Chaudière

1:30pm

(90 min) New Ways of Informing Policy by Leveraging Scientific Knowledge: Two Models related to Public-Academic Collaborations / De nouvelles façons d'éclairer les politiques en se servant du savoir scientifique : deux modèles associés aux collaborations
Organized by: Social Sciences and Humanities Research Council of Canada, Chantal Barton

A dynamic multi-sectoral panel organized by the Social Sciences and Humanities Research Council (SSHRC) that illustrates innovative approaches to inform evidence-based decision-making in policy development. Two successfully implemented models of collaboration between researchers and graduate students and other federal departments/agencies will be showcased. These models are set in the context of SSHRC’s Imagining Canada’s Future initiative, which positions the social sciences and humanities as essential to addressing complex societal challenges facing Canadians, to the greater benefit of Canada and the world.

The first model features the International Policy Ideas Challenge (IPIC) - a special initiative developed in partnership between SSHRC and Global Affairs Canada (GAC), which taps into the talent base in post-secondary institutions across Canada, with graduate students and emerging scholars poised to inform policy development on key priority areas identified by GAC. In 2017, IPIC included key themes such as promoting democracy in a digital age; implications of climate change for Canadian trade and investment; and identifying best ways for Canada to support fragile and conflict-affected states.  Speakers will include Ioanna Sahas Martin, Director, International Assistance Research and Knowledge, GAC and Maïka Sondarjee, a SSHRC doctoral candidate, University of Toronto, and 2017 IPIC winner for her policy brief on the topic of, “Inclusive Gender-Based Analysis (GBA)+ in public participation processes”.

The second model will be illustrated by the work of Dr. Bipasha Baruah, Canada Research Chair in Global Women’s Issues, Western University and Ian Clark, Acting Chief, Economic Research, Science Integration and Outreach, Natural Resources Canada (NRCan).  Following a knowledge synthesis report produced by Dr. Baruah, as part of SSHRC’s Imagining Canada’s Future initiative, NRCan commissioned Dr. Baruah to produce a dedicated report on “Women in Natural Resources Sectors”, which examines current participation rates of women in natural resources industries and formulates recommendations for governments and industry to increase recruitment, retention and advancement of women in the sector.
Both models foster effective collaboration between the academic and public sectors, and  will provide a good foundation on which to engage the audience in a discussion about these and other new ways of informing policy through scientific knowledge.

Moderators
avatar for Madeline Johnson

Madeline Johnson

Foreign Service Officer, Global Affairs Canada
Madeline Johnson is a Foreign Service Officer with Global Affairs Canada (GAC), currently working inthe Foreign Policy Research and Foresight Division as a Senior Policy Analyst. She is the lead coordinator of the International Policy Ideas Challenge and contributes to a critical... Read More →

Speakers
avatar for Bipasha Baruah

Bipasha Baruah

Canada Research Chair in Global Women’s Issues, Western University
Bipasha Baruah is the Canada Research Chair in Global Women’s Issues, and a professor of women’sstudies and feminist research at Western University, Canada. Dr. Baruah conducts interdisciplinaryresearch on gender, development and globalization; women and work; and social, political... Read More →
avatar for Ian Clark

Ian Clark

Chief of the Economic Research, Science Integration and Outreach Division, Natural Resources Canada
Ian Clark is Chief of the Economic Research, Science Integration and Outreach Division at Natural Resources Canada.  The Division leads several initiatives to strengthen science and policy integration across the Department. One major initiative is NRCan's annual Science and Policy... Read More →
avatar for Ioanna Sahas Martin

Ioanna Sahas Martin

Director for International Assistance Research and Knowledge, Global Affairs Canada
Ioanna Sahas Martin is Director for International Assistance Research and Knowledge at Global AffairsCanada, with over 20 years experience in development and foreign policy. Previously Director forCentral America and the Caribbean, the Haiti development program, and International... Read More →
avatar for Maïka Sondarjee

Maïka Sondarjee

SSHRC Doctoral Candidate, University of Toronto
Maïka Sondarjee is a Ph.D. candidate in political science at the University of Toronto and a graduate associate at the Centre for Critical Development Studies (CCDS) and at the Centre d’études et de recherches internationales (CERIUM). Her SSHRC-funded dissertation focuses on... Read More →


Wednesday November 7, 2018 1:30pm - 3:00pm
Delta Hotel - Joliet-Frontenac

1:30pm

(90 min) Communication culture: scientists' views and trainers' methods to better engage with publics and policy-makers / Culture de dialogue : objectifs des scientifiques et méthodes des formations pour mieux coopérer avec le public et les décideurs poli
Organized by: Carleton School of Journalism and Communication

Canadian scientists want to engage with non scientists to ensure that policy makers use scientific evidence to form public policy. This rationale for engagement was given top priority in a recent survey of NSERC Discovery grantees when asked about their communication objectives. The survey was carried out in 2017-18.

Ensuring continued research funding came in second, and in third place, but sill with a strong showing was the desire to ensure Canadian culture values science.

Mindful of these priorities, this panel will look at ways and means of how these goals might be realized in practice. How important is communications training?  Just over half the survey respondents had some media training. Is it working?

At one time, academics believed that transferring knowledge to non-scientists was adequate and advisable. No longer.

Scientists are taught to use techniques like storytelling, active listening, empathy in the expanding number of workshops and sessions offered by research-informed science communicators in training organizations across North America and Europe.

The panelists all have relevant academic and practical approaches to help scientists communicate more effectively when talking to media, policy makers or interested audiences. The questions about what works best relies on articulating how we measure successful outcomes with the methods used to achieve desired goals. In other words, injecting some science into science communication.

The moderator will expand on the expertise of the panel by eliciting audience experiences. The session will explore the communication issues and best practices for those who want to ensure that scientific evidence is a vital part of the body politic and an appreciation of science is a fundamental aspect of Canadian culture. 

Moderators
avatar for Kathryn O'Hara

Kathryn O'Hara

Adjunct Research Professor, School of Journalism and Communication, Carleton University
Kathryn O'Hara is  a science journalism educator and communicator with 40 years in public broadcasting and academia. She held the CTV Chair in Science Broadcast Journalism at Carleton until she retired  in 2018.  She served on the executive board of the World Federation of Science... Read More →

Speakers
avatar for Dr John D. Besley

Dr John D. Besley

Ellis B Brandt Professor, Michigan State University
Dr John D. Besley studies how views about decision-makers and decision processes affect  perceptions of science and technology.  His work emphasizes the need to look at both  citizens perceptions of decision-makers and decision-makers’ perceptions of the public.  He has published... Read More →
avatar for Sarah Everts

Sarah Everts

Journalist at the Max Planck Institute & associate professor at Carleton University (effective January 2019)
Sarah Everts is an award-winning science journalist and science communication trainer currently based in Berlin, Germany. In January 2019, she will relocate to Ottawa as an associate professor and holder of the  CTV Chair in Digital Science Journalism at Carleton University. Her... Read More →
avatar for Jim Handman

Jim Handman

Executive Director, Science Media Centre of Canada
Jim Handman is a freelance science journalist, media  trainer, and as of 2017, the executive director of the Science Media Centre of Canada.  For 17 years, Jim was the Executive Producer of  CBC Radio's award-winning science program, Quirks &  Quarks. Jim has also taught broadcast... Read More →


Wednesday November 7, 2018 1:30pm - 3:00pm
Delta Hotel - Richelieu

1:30pm

(90 min) International Science and Canada - Addressing Global Agenda 2030 Together / Science internationale et le Canada - répondre ensemble au programme mondial 2030
Organized by: Gordon McBean 

The Global Agenda 2030 covers a wide range of international scientific policy and societal issues pertinent to global economic development. This complex and intersectional Agenda encompasses the 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development, the Paris Agreement on Climate Change, and the Sendai Framework for Disaster Risk Reduction. Across these coalitions and programs, there is a great need for scientific work to be effectively coordinated internationally as well as within each country. Presently, international scientific research and development are coordinated through global programs such as the World Climate Research Programme, Global Framework for Climate Services, Future Earth, World Data System, and global observational programs. In parallel, within Canada, our world-class research communities are effectively coordinated through the Networks of Centres of Excellence, CIFAR, government laboratories, and other Canadian research organizations.

This session will present and discuss international and national scientific programs, with a focus on how the scientific community can work together effectively to address critical policy issues and coordinate interdisciplinary research within Canada and internationally. One of the highlights of our session is elucidating Canada's role in the new International Science Council – a merger of the International Council for Science and the International Social Sciences Council – whose vision is to advance all sciences as a global public good.

Moderators
avatar for Gordon McBean

Gordon McBean

Professor, Western University; President, International Council for Science
Professor Gordon McBean has been President of the International Council for Science since 2014 and his term ended on July 4, 2018, with the formal merger with the International Social Sciences Council to create the International Science Council – all sciences for the global good... Read More →

Speakers
avatar for Alan Bernstein

Alan Bernstein

President & CEO, Canadian Institute for Advanced Research
Dr. Alan Bernstein became CIFAR’s President and Chief Executive Officer in May 2012. From 2000 to 2007, he served as the inaugural president of the Canadian Institutes of Health Research (CIHR), Canada’s federal agency for the support of health research. In that capacity, he led... Read More →
avatar for David Grimes

David Grimes

Assistant Deputy Minister, Meteorological Services Canada; President of World Meteorological Organization
David Grimes has been Assistant Deputy Minister and head of Environment Canada's Meteorological Service of Canada since July 2006. He has been Canada's Permanent Representative with World Meteorological Organization since December 2006.David was re-elected President of the WMO by... Read More →
avatar for Ted Hewitt

Ted Hewitt

President, Social Sciences and Humanities Research Council
Dr. W. E. (Ted) Hewitt is President of the Social Sciences and Humanities Research Council of Canada. Between 2012 and 2015, he was Executive Vice-President at the Council. Since 1989, he has been Professor of Sociology at the University of Western Ontario, in London Canada, and in... Read More →
avatar for Amy Luers

Amy Luers

Executive Director, Future Earth
Amy Luers is Executive Director of Future Earth. Previously, she was the Director of Climate at the Skoll Global Threats Fund (SGTF) and Assistant Director for Climate Resilience and Information at the White House Office of Science and Technology Policy (OSTP). Previously, she was... Read More →
avatar for Maria Uhle, PhD

Maria Uhle, PhD

Program Director for International Activities; Directorate for Geosciences, National Science Foundation
Dr. Maria Uhle currently serves as the Program Director for International Activities in the Directorate for Geosciences at the National Science Foundation, where she develops mechanisms and agreements to foster international research collaboration through the Belmont Forum, the Inter-American... Read More →
avatar for Wendy Watson-Wright

Wendy Watson-Wright

Chief Executive Officer, Ocean Frontier Institute
Dr. Wendy Watson-Wright is the Chief Executive Officer of the Ocean Frontier Institute (OFI).  Headquartered at Dalhousie University and in partnership with Memorial University and the University of Prince Edward Island, the OFI is an interdisciplinary transnational research institute... Read More →


Wednesday November 7, 2018 1:30pm - 3:00pm
Delta Ottawa, International Ballroom

1:30pm

(90 min) A Data Native Generation's Approach to Science: Science Instruction Vs. Inquiry into Science / Une approche propre à la génération de données pour la science : enseignement scientifique ou requête scientifique
Organized by: STEM Fellowship, Mohammad Asadi Lari

Current class and curriculum structures don’t answer a data-native generation’s knowledge acquisition needs and practices. This generation has honed its skills through the years of using information technology, the Internet, and yes, gaming. Modern students come to school with already developed learning techniques, which some of them may hide, keeping teachers happy within the current model; however, some cannot and end up getting into trouble by not meeting the curriculum expectations.

Following the paths of social media and open access culture, academic publishers consciously or unconsciously invited a new generation of learners to scholarly communication. Modern scholarly publication formats like Open Access or even Facebook academic journals have a far-reaching effect triggering students’ curiosity and challenging them with real scientific findings. Introduction of electronic impact factor indicators like Altmetric went even further, allowing a new generation to become participants of the public “peer-review” process.

The new generation of science learners often start with derivatives of research that they pick up in the form of social network reflections on scholarly publications and academic findings. They grasp the concepts from blogs, news stories and even Youtubes and Facebook posts that lead them directly to abstracts and manuscripts. The last often present information far beyond their ability to comprehend, which results in two new science learning phenomena. On one hand, they skim through publications and extract facts and theories within the scope of their understanding. On another, these elements serve as a new motivation for science studies and often leads them to generate unorthodox interdisciplinary ideas and theories. In order to bridge their knowledge gaps they form groups, which are fertile ground for non-institutionalized scholarship. Within these groups, it is possible to observe very interesting forms of scholarly interaction. These are collective presentations and Q&As where presenters complement and change each other without formal moderation.

STEM Fellowship (SF) is a unique example of a largely youth-led initiative to bridge these gaps. As a Canada-wide community, we focus on bridging gaps in data science (with our acclaimed Big Data Challenges), scientific communication (through challenges, workshops and the Canadian Science Publishing sponsored STEM Fellowship Journal) and community (through a network of high schools and university campuses dotted all across Canada. This panel would not only focus on our experience on the data-native generation’s approach to science, but also that of our numerous partners, which also shows how important cross-sector collaborations and discussions are in generating multi-dimensional solutions.


Moderators
avatar for Mohammad Asadi Lari

Mohammad Asadi Lari

Managing Director, STEM Fellowship & MD/PhD Candidate, U of T
Mohammad is co-founder and managing director of STEM Fellowship and an MD/PhD candidate at the University of Toronto. In May 2018, he graduated from the Honours in Cellular, Anatomical and Physiological Sciences (CAPS) program from the University of British Columbia and subsequently... Read More →

Speakers
avatar for Suzanne Kettley

Suzanne Kettley

Executive Director, Canadian Science Publishing
Suzanne Kettley is the Executive Director of Canadian Science Publishing (CSP), Canada’s not-for-profit leader in mobilizing scientific knowledge and publisher of 24 journals including FACETS, Canada’s first multidisciplinary open access science journal. With three decades of... Read More →
avatar for Dr. Sacha Noukhovitch

Dr. Sacha Noukhovitch

Founder and Executive Director, STEM Fellowship
Dr. Sacha Noukhovitch is a champion of the data-native generation talent development and expert in their knowledge acquisition practices. He designs and implements new forms of student-driven education like big data inquiry and experiential learning program.Dr. Noukhovitch is a founder... Read More →
avatar for Bonnie Schmidt

Bonnie Schmidt

Founder and President, Let's Talk Science
Dr. Bonnie Schmidt, C.M. is the founder and president of Let’s Talk Science, an award-winning, national charitable organization that she started in 1991 while completing a Ph.D. in Physiology. Let’s Talk Science helps children and youth fulfill their potential and prepare for... Read More →
avatar for Dr. Alan Winter

Dr. Alan Winter

Innovation Commissioner
Dr. Alan Winter is British Columbia’s first Innovation Commissioner. He has wide experience at senior levels in the technology sector and in government, including such roles as the President and CEO of Genome BC from 2001 to 2016, the founding President and CEO of the New Media... Read More →


Wednesday November 7, 2018 1:30pm - 3:00pm
Delta Ottawa - Capitale

2:15pm

(45 min) Longevity Innovation for Sustainable Aging / Innovation sur la longétivité pour un vieillissement durable
Organized by: Baycrest Health Sciences/Centre for Aging and Brain Health Innovation, Allison Sekuler

Canada, and many other countries, are aging faster than at any time in history. There now are more Canadians over 65 than under 15, and by 2030, nearly 1 in 4 Canadians will be 65 or older. This demographic shift will impact every aspect of our lives: from the workforce to recreation, from transportation to healthcare. The so-called silver tsunami brings with it a looming public health crisis: growing numbers of individuals with dementia and complex chronic medical issues, but a shortage of long-term care beds and other care options. It is estimated that 50 million people worldwide already live with dementia, with that number reaching 75 million by 2030. And, although the cost of dementia is immeasurable for those who suffer from the disease and their loved ones and caregivers, economists estimate the worldwide cost at US$1 trillion, rising to US$2 trillion by 2030.

But is that future inevitable, or is there a path to sustainable aging? A path to a society in which people can age in place and thrive throughout their lifetimes; a society in which aging is a process rather than an endpoint; a society in which our demographic changes lead to enhanced cultural, social, and economic prosperity for Canada. The convergence of precision medicine, technology, big data, and artificial intelligence could chart that path. Fully 70% of our economy is driven by baby-boomers, making age-related innovation a critical and growing field.  Virtual and augmented reality, assistive bots, social robots, driverless cars, connected homes, smart cities, and personalized and predictive medicine promise to transform a silver tsunami into a silver economy. However, given the size and diversity of Canada, that promise face many challenges, including concerns about data sharing and privacy; inter-regional jurisdiction of health information; cultural differences in healthcare practices; adoption, procurement, and funding of novel technologies; stigmas associated with aging; and the critical need to create a culture of longevity-innovation.

This panel brings together a diverse group of experts in aging, science and technology, innovation, healthcare practice, and policy to explore the challenges, promises, and opportunities for innovation, and to chart a path for sustainable aging in Canada.


Moderators
avatar for Allison Sekuler

Allison Sekuler

Baycrest Health Sciences/Centre for Aging and Brain Health Innovation
Dr. Allison Sekuler (BA Mathematics & Psychology, Pomona College; PhD Psychology, UC Berkeley; Fellow, Society of Experimental Psychologists) is the Sandra A. Rotman Chair in Cognitive Neuroscience and Managing Director of the Rotman Research Institute at Baycrest Health Sciences... Read More →

Speakers
avatar for Dr. Carrie Bourassa

Dr. Carrie Bourassa

Chair in Indigenous & Northern Health and Senior Scientist at Health Sciences North Research Institute; Scientific Director of the Institute of Indigenous Peoples’ Health at the Canadian Institutes of Health Research
Dr. Carrie Bourassa is a Chair in Indigenous & Northern Health and Senior Scientist at Health Sciences North Research Institute in Sudbury, Ontario and the Scientific Director of the Institute of Indigenous Peoples’ Health at the Canadian Institutes of Health Research. Prior to... Read More →
avatar for Maureen O’Neil

Maureen O’Neil

President, Canadian Foundation for Healthcare Improvement
Maureen O’Neil is President of the Canadian Foundation for Healthcare Improvement. After joining the organization in 2008, Ms. O’Neil successfully re-oriented the Foundation from its previous mandate in applied health services research to its current role in healthcare improvement... Read More →
avatar for Ritesh Patel

Ritesh Patel

Chief Digital Officer, Ogilvy's Health & Wellness
Ritesh Patel is responsible for providing digital vision, leadership and guidance for Ogilvy's Health & Wellness customers globally.He joined Ogilvy after 4 years as the Chief Digital officer at Ogilvy CommonHealth, the specialist healthcare agency within WPP where, working with the... Read More →
avatar for Andrew Sixsmith, PhD

Andrew Sixsmith, PhD

Director of the STAR (Science and Technology for Aging Research) Institute, the joint Scientific Director of AGE-WELL NCE; Professor in the Department of Gerontology at Simon Fraser University
Andrew Sixsmith, PhD, is the Director of the STAR (Science and Technology for Aging Research) Institute, the joint Scientific Director of AGE-WELL NCE, and a professor in the Department of Gerontology at Simon Fraser University. He is past President of the International Society of... Read More →


Wednesday November 7, 2018 2:15pm - 3:00pm
Delta Ottawa - Chaudière

3:00pm

Coffee Break
Wednesday November 7, 2018 3:00pm - 3:30pm
Delta Ottawa, International Ballroom

3:30pm

(45 min) Harnessing Diversity and Inclusion to Drive Innovation in Canadian Science and Technology / Mobiliser la diversité et l'inclusion pour susciter l'innovation en matière de sciences et de technologies au Canada
Organized by: Ryerson University, Wendy Cukier

In recent years, Canadian employers, economists and industry analysts have lamented a shortage of qualified personnel to drive science and technology innovation, entrepreneurship, and economic growth (CME/CSTEC, 2017; ICTC, 2017). Leading organizations in Canada’s professional, scientific and technical services (PST) sector still struggle to create equitable and inclusive environments for members of diverse groups (Coe & Hariri, 2017). Despite extensive policy and organizational changes, limited progress has been made in addressing barriers to diverse groups in Canada’s PST sector (Coe & Hariri, 2017). Many racialized minorities face unconscious bias and limited career opportunities within small- and medium-sized enterprises (SMEs) (Access Alliance, 2011). The “chilly climate” and pay differentials persist for women in STEM (Caranci et al., 2017; Cukier, 2007; ICTC, 2017). Indigenous youth, one of Canada’s fastest growing segments (Statistics Canada, 2011), comprise merely 1.2% of ICT workers (ICTC, 2017). Immigrant and female technology entrepreneurs continue to confront gender- related industry barriers (Orser, 2009; Orser et al., 2012; Orser & Riding, 2016; Cukier, 2017). Even though entrepreneurship is a desirable pathway to economic integration for members of diverse groups, particularly immigrants, recent reviews of Ontario’s incubator and innovation ecosystem suggest that the governance, processes, and resources do not support those from diverse groups (Canada-US Council for Advancement of Women, 2018). In this complex ecosystem, there is an acute need to leverage diversity to drive change.

This panel will concurrently examine the ways in which diversity produces the innovations that galvanize economic growth and the role of leading-edge tools, applications and approaches in fostering innovation for inclusion in Canada’s science and technical sector. Informed by an awareness of the skills gap and applying an ecological approach to diversity, this panel of leading technology and entrepreneurship scholars and industry experts will generate a practical alignment and reciprocal engagement between inclusion and innovation. They will identify and assess the potential of technology-enabled applications and tools that promote inclusion and examine how diversity can generating access to top talent and creative imaginations, expanding reach, and improving firm performance through inclusion and engagement. The panel will consider ways to replicate and share innovative tools and build capacity for evidence-based approaches to diversity policy. Finally, it will unpack how policies, practices and tools can advance inclusion by matching diverse job seekers to employers. Overall, this panel will emphasize how employers and policy makers can harness innovation and inclusion to create productive science and technology industries.

Moderators
avatar for Wendy Cukier

Wendy Cukier

Professor of Entrepreneurship and Strategy and Founder of the Diversity Institute in the Ted Rogers School of Management at Ryerson University
Dr. Wendy Cukier, Professor of Entrepreneurship and Strategy and Founder of the Diversity Institute in the Ted Rogers School of Management at Ryerson University (ON), is a multidisciplinary researcher, teacher and leader, committed to advancing innovation and social justice. She is... Read More →

Speakers
CC

Charlie Carter

Policy Lead, Public Policy Forum
Charlie Carter brings over ten years of experience as a knowledge mobilization practitioner, stakeholder engagement leader and program manager to his work as a Policy Lead.Charlie’s work is anchored by a desire to tackle complex policy problems by championing the use of real-world... Read More →
avatar for Mohamed Elmi

Mohamed Elmi

PhD Candidate, University of Cape Town
Mohamed Elmi is a PhD Candidate (ABD) in Information Systems at University of Cape Town and a Project Coordinator with the Ted Rogers School of Management's Institute for Innovation and Technology Management at Ryerson University. Mohamed’s doctoral research focuses on how Information... Read More →
avatar for Jaigris Hodson

Jaigris Hodson

Assistant Professor of Interdisciplinary Studies, Royal Roads University
Dr. Jaigris Hodson is Assistant Professor of Interdisciplinary Studies at Royal Roads University in BC. Her research specializes in understanding how people interact with digital technologies, such as social media, and the content that is produced and shared using those technologies... Read More →
avatar for Doaa Mansour

Doaa Mansour

Advancing Women in STEM at Youth Employment Services Montreal
Doaa Mansour leads Advancing Women in STEM at Youth Employment Services (YES) Montreal, which is the third installment of a programming series that aims to increase women’s retention and access to leadership opportunities within the STEM industry. The program is funded by Status... Read More →


Wednesday November 7, 2018 3:30pm - 4:15pm
Delta Ottawa - Capitale

3:30pm

(45 min) Innovating Science Communication / Innovation en matière de communication scientifique
Organized by: Pixels and Plans, Julia Krolik 

Effective and timely science communication is the very vessel that informs decision makers, thereby having a direct effect on the way science policies are generated. Indeed there have been challenges with science communication, as evidenced by the creation of Evidence for Democracy, a not-for-profit organization promoting the transparent use of evidence in government decision-making in Canada. Currently, the landscape of science communication is shifting with many diverse communication avenues becoming more readily available across all sectors including academia, governments and the public. Our panel on Innovating Science Communication consists of a diverse group of panelists that practice different forms of science communication in Canada.
 
The group will discuss five different science communication approaches and the milestones achieved. The panel moderator, Julia Krolik of Pixels and Plans, an agency practicing and teaching the art of good data, will present from-the-field case studies of how fusing data science and creative direction to tackle science communication problems helps organizations reach and engage their intended audiences. Dr. Chantal Barriault, Director of the Science Communication Program at Laurentian University will discuss how the
curriculum has evolved and what a Science Communication degree means for educating and inspiring future generations of communicators and policy makers. Jonathan Provost, an Environmental Scientist at Indigenous and Northern Affairs Canada, will cover science communication initiatives in the public sector and the complications of speaking to the general public. Catherine Lau, Program Evaluation Officer at Art the Science, an nonprofit organization that facilitates artist residencies in science laboratories will present recent residency evaluation findings and discuss the value of including art as a science communication platform. Finally, Samantha Yammine, a PhD Candidate in Neuroscience and Stem Cell Biology at the University of Toronto will discuss her successful use of social media platforms to communicate science and engage diverse audiences as well as incorporate social media metrics on Canadian science policy discussions.

Panel attendees will be presented with an overview of novel and traditional approaches to
Science Communication. These methods provide insights to overcoming challenges of communicating science to diverse audiences. Since science communication plays an important role in science policy decision making, the diverse topics covered in this panel are a valuable resource to a Canadian Science Policy audience.



Moderators
avatar for Julia Krolik

Julia Krolik

Founder, Pixels and Plans & Art the Science
Julia Krolik is a creative director, entrepreneur, scientist and award-winning artist. Formally educated in the sciences, her work has taken numerous turns and includes research involving micro/molecular biology, statistics, geospatial analytics, public health, water quality and hydrogeology... Read More →

Speakers
avatar for Dr. Chantal Barriault

Dr. Chantal Barriault

Director of the Science Communication Graduate Program, Laurentian University and Science North
Dr. Chantal Barriault is the Director of the Science Communication Graduate Program, the only one of its kind in Canada, offered jointly by Laurentian University and Science North. The program covers the theory underlying good communication as well as the practical challenges of effectively... Read More →
avatar for Catherine Lau

Catherine Lau

Program Evaluation Officer, Art the Science
Catherine is a former behavioral neuroscientist turned science communicator. She has used diverse mediums to communicate science including hands-on demonstrations, exhibit design, film/animation, writing and art. While she is passionate about science outreach for youth, she also has... Read More →
avatar for Jonathan Provost

Jonathan Provost

Real Property Divestment Program Manager, National Defence
Jonathan has over 10 years of professional experience working as a Government scientist. Facilitating large and small events; mediating relationships with stakeholders and partners; implementing innovative and sustainable communication tools, practices and cultures within the Public... Read More →
avatar for Samantha Yammine

Samantha Yammine

Science Communicator and PhD Candidate in the Department of Molecular Genetics, University of Toronto
Samantha Yammine is a Science Communicator and PhD Candidate in the Department of Molecular Genetics at the University of Toronto. Her research in Dr. van der Kooy’s laboratory focuses on stem cell lineages in the developing brain, and targeted approaches for activating stem cells... Read More →


Wednesday November 7, 2018 3:30pm - 4:15pm
Delta Hotel - Joliet-Frontenac

3:30pm

(90 min) Bringing Innovative Medicines into the Hands of Patients with Alzheimer's disease
Organized by: Hoffmann-La Roche Ltd.

In 2016, an estimated 747,000 Canadians were living with Alzheimer’s Disease (AD) and related dementias. It is estimated that by 2030, 1.4 million Canadians will have AD or related dementias, an increase of 66 percent. By 2050, that number will increase to 2.8 million. As in other major markets, this rapidly increasing prevalence of people with AD and dementia is a significant concern to policymakers who are exploring how they can best support patients with AD and related dementia and their loved ones.
Recognizing the significant need and their commitment to improving the lives of Canadians with dementia, the Government of Canada announced in May 2018 that it was moving forward with a National Dementia Strategy. The Strategy will consider the experience of those living with dementia and will build on existing working being undertaken across Canada in this area. The Strategy poses a unique opportunity to define what is required from a healthcare system readiness perspective. 

The objective of the panel will be to explore the current work being undertaken by the Government of Canada to improve the regulatory and healthcare environment in order to bring innovative therapies into the hands of patients. The panel discussion is meant to ignite public policy discourse related to:
  • Current state of affairs in Canada and what is required from a healthcare readiness perspective in order to positive impact the lives of patient living with AD and their caregivers
  • Understand the current regulatory and market access decision making process and the gaps that exist in bringing innovative diagnostics and therapies to market in the area of Alzheimer’s Disease
  • Existing healthcare system gaps and existing opportunities to bridge those gaps

Moderators
avatar for Soeren Mattke (MD, DSc)

Soeren Mattke (MD, DSc)

Senior Scientist at USC and the Director of the Center for Improving Chronic Illness Care
Soeren Mattke (MD, DSc) is a Senior Scientist at USC and the Director of the Center for Improving Chronic Illness Care. Dr. Mattke is an expert in innovations to prevent, diagnose and manage chronic disease via better drugs, devices and technologies, improved delivery models and value-based... Read More →

Speakers
avatar for Christin Bexelius

Christin Bexelius

Doctor Christin Bexelius has since 2015 been leading payer related activities to support Roche’s phase III clinical trial programs in Basel, Switzerland. Through her work she has been working close with both internal and external stakeholders in relation to access and policy, including... Read More →
avatar for Andrew R. Frank M.D. B.Sc.H. F.R.C.P.(C)

Andrew R. Frank M.D. B.Sc.H. F.R.C.P.(C)

Cognitive and Behavioural Neurologist; Medical Director, Bruyère Memory Program, Élisabeth Bruyère Hospital
Dr. Andrew Frank is a cognitive and behavioural neurologist, and is the medical director of the Bruyère Memory Program at the Élisabeth Bruyère Hospital in Ottawa, Ontario.After finishing his Bachelor’s degree in Honours Biochemistry at the University of Calgary, Dr. Frank completed... Read More →
avatar for Dr. K. Jennifer Ingram MD, FRCPC

Dr. K. Jennifer Ingram MD, FRCPC

Founder, Medical Director and Qualified Investigator at the Kawartha Centre – Redefining Healthy Aging
Dr. Ingram earned her medical degree from Queen’s University and is a specialist in Internal and Geriatric Medicine, practicing in Peterborough, Ontario. She is the Founder, Medical Director and Qualified Investigator at the Kawartha Centre – Redefining Healthy Aging, a community-based... Read More →
avatar for Pauline Tardif

Pauline Tardif

Chief Executive Officer, Alzheimer Society of Canada
Pauline Tardif is the Chief Executive Officer of the Alzheimer Society of Canada. Pauline co-chairs the federal Ministerial Advisory Board on Dementia established by the Minister of Health in 2018. The Advisory Board is providing evidence-informed advice on current and emerging issues... Read More →


Wednesday November 7, 2018 3:30pm - 5:00pm
Delta Ottawa - Chaudière

3:30pm

(90 min) Shaping science policy to improve equity, diversity and inclusion / Façonner les politiques scientifiques pour favoriser l'équité, la diversité, et l'inclusion
Organized by: Fonds de recherche du Québec, Fanny Eugène

Progress has been slow in increasing diversity in the scientific community. A recent report from the Canadian Association of University Teachers shows that while the representation of women among university professors has improved over the past decade, they are still highly underrepresented in science, technology, engineering and mathematics (STEM), and their proportion still decreases in all sectors as we move up the academic ranks. Indigenous peoples and some racialized groups are also underrepresented. This panel will present case studies that illustrate how we can improve policies to help increase equity, diversity and inclusion in science. It will bring together perspectives from a university, provincial and federal funding agencies, an international non-profit organization, as well as from the younger generation.

At the institution level, Ryerson University has shown great leadership by intentionally prioritizing equity and inclusion values, as the first university in Canada to create a vice-president post in charge of equity and community inclusion with the mandate of identifying and addressing systemic barriers. At the provincial level, the Fonds de recherche du Québec and the ministry of Economy, Science and Innovation are currently working on UNESCO’s SAGA (STEM and Gender Advancement) project, which will help identify gaps and improve Québec’s science policies to improve gender equality in STEM. At the federal level, the three granting agencies, including the Tri-Agency Institutional Programs Secretariat are currently putting in place equity, diversity and inclusion (EDI) action plans to embed EDI in every aspect of the research they support. At the international level, the American Association for the Advancement of Science is currently conducting a pilot project called SEA (STEM Equality Advancement) Change, which encourages and recognizes institutions’ efforts toward equity, diversity and inclusion, through an award system based on the United Kingdom’s Athena SWAN model.

A student perspective will be included on this panel, as students can play an important role in shaping science policy, through initiatives such as #Students4theReport, a social media campaign that encouraged the Canadian government to follow recommendations from the Fundamental Science Review committee, including the development of policies aimed at improving equity and diversity in science.

Moderators
avatar for Maryse Lassonde

Maryse Lassonde

President, Conseil supérieur de l’éducation (Government of Quebec)
Professor Lassonde currently is the President of the Conseil supérieur de l’Éducation (Government of Quebec). She completed a Ph.D. in neuropsychology at Stanford University. She went on to become professor first at the Université du Québec à Trois-Rivières (UQTR, 1977-1988... Read More →

Speakers
avatar for Mary-Rose Bradley-Gill,

Mary-Rose Bradley-Gill,

Vice-President External Relations, Science & Policy Exchange
Mary-Rose Bradley-Gill is a PhD Candidate in Biology at McGill University. She is VP External Relations with Science & Policy Exchange (SPE), a student-run non-profit that aims to foster discussion on science policy issues and acts as the student voice in evidence-based decision making... Read More →
avatar for Shirley Malcom

Shirley Malcom

Director, Education and Human Resources Programs, American Association for the Advancement of Science
Shirley Malcom is head of Education and Human Resources Programs at AAAS. She works to improve the quality and increase access to education and careers in STEM fields as well as to enhance public science literacy. Dr. Malcom is a trustee of Caltech and a regent of Morgan State University... Read More →
avatar for Denise O’Neil Green, PhD

Denise O’Neil Green, PhD

Vice-President, Equity and Community Inclusion, Ryerson University
Dr. Denise O'Neil Green is the first Vice-President, Equity and Community Inclusion (VPECI) at Ryerson University in Toronto, Ontario.  Dr. Green whose leadership, advocacy and deep-rooted passion for the advancement of inclusive campuses, has championed organizational change in... Read More →
avatar for Serge Villemure

Serge Villemure

Director, Scholarships, Fellowships and Chairs for Women and Science in Engineering, Natural Sciences and Engineering Research Council
Serge Villemure graduated in 1989 with a B.Sc. in Kinesiology and obtained his Masters in 1991 in Administration from the University of Ottawa. Serge joined NSERC in 1991 where he worked as a Program Administrator in different disciplines within the Research Grants Division. In 1997... Read More →


Wednesday November 7, 2018 3:30pm - 5:00pm
Delta Hotel - Richelieu

3:30pm

(90 min) The status of science literacy in Canada / Profil des connaissances scientifiques au Canada
Organized by: Ontario Science Centre, Maurice Bitran

The level of science literacy and the attitudes of the population towards science and technology are important to the future of technology-based societies like ours. Not only because our economy is dependent on technology, but also because many social issues are affected by science and technology, effectively making science literacy a requirement for meaningful participation in the public policy dialogue. What do Canadians think about science and technology? Do they trust scientists and scientific results?What do they think about science and technology related issues such as climate change or artificial intelligence?

For the third consecutive year, the Ontario Science Centre has conducted an on-line survey on science literacy and attitudes towards science across Canada. A review of its main results will serve as the background for this discussion in which each panel member will also discuss what their organizations are doing to increase public literacy and public trust in science.


Moderators
avatar for Maurice Bitran

Maurice Bitran

CEO and Chief Science Officer, Ontario Science Centre
Dr. Maurice Bitran is the Ontario Science Centre’s Chief Executive Officer and Chief Science Officer.  He joined the Centre in 2014 after wide-ranging careers in government and in academia.In the Ontario government he was the Assistant Deputy Minister (ADM) of the Integrated Environmental... Read More →

Speakers
avatar for Dr. Eugenia Duodu

Dr. Eugenia Duodu

CEO, Visions of Science
Eugenia Duodu is the CEO of Visions of Science Network for Learning (www.vosnl.org), a charitable organization that empowers youth from low-income communities through meaningful engagement in STEM (science, technology, engineering and math). She devotes her time to community and global... Read More →
avatar for Dr. Mona Nemer

Dr. Mona Nemer

Chief Science Advisor, Government of Canada
Dr. Mona Nemer is the Chief Science Advisor to Canada’s Prime Minister and Minister of Science. Her mandate is to provide advice on issues related to science and government policies that support it. This includes advising on ways to ensure that science is considered in policy decisions... Read More →
avatar for Dr. Molly Shoichet

Dr. Molly Shoichet

University Professor and Senior Advisor to the President on Science and Engineering Engagement, University of Toronto
Professor Molly Shoichet holds the Tier 1 Canada Research Chair in Tissue Engineering at the University of Toronto.  She served as Ontario’s first Chief Scientist in 2018 where she worked to enhance the culture of science in Ontario. Dr. Shoichet has published over 575 papers... Read More →


Wednesday November 7, 2018 3:30pm - 5:00pm
Delta Ottawa, International Ballroom

4:15pm

(45 min) A two-way street: science informing policy, and policy informing science
Organized by: The National Alliance of Provincial Health Research Organizations

It has been said that the greatest purpose of scientific inquiry is in its potential, and therefore unpredictable, contribution to the benefit of all people. Various approaches have been at play to enable cross-sectoral decisions, collaborations, investments, and networking that aim to harness that potential and increase the likelihood of moving the value of research towards innovations with broad organizational and societal scope and benefit. To make these approaches effective, on the one hand, decision makers need to understand the ins and outs of the autonomous research process and how best to enable it over the entire timeline from discovery to impact. On the other hand, decision makers can also put challenges to the research community to stimulate research, collaborations, and innovation activities in areas where there are known knowledge gaps.

Policy and science have and have to continue to interact on various levels. Our panel will present pan Canadian perspectives on how this process occurs to establish cross sectoral culture, to identify and respond to regional and local needs, and to facilitate effective dialogue.

Moderators
avatar for Deborah Gordon-El Bihbety

Deborah Gordon-El Bihbety

President & CEO, Research Canada: An Alliance for Health Discovery
Ms. Deborah Gordon-El-Bihbety has been the President and CEO of Research Canada for fifteen years. She brings considerable executive level experience in public policy, health advocacy, government relations,association management, project management and media relations to Research... Read More →

Speakers
avatar for Denise Amyot

Denise Amyot

President and CEO, Colleges and Institutes Canada
Denise Amyot est la présidente-directrice générale de Collèges et instituts Canadadepuis juin 2013. Collèges et instituts Canada (CICan) est le porte-parole descollèges, instituts et cégeps publics canadiens et un chef de file mondial en matièred’éducation axée sur l’emploi... Read More →
avatar for Krista Connell

Krista Connell

Chief Executive Officer, Nova Scotia Health Research Foundation
Krista is responsible for providing the leadership and professional guidance necessary for the NSHRF to attain its mandate of improving the health of Nova Scotians through health research.Krista works collaboratively with the NSHRF Board of Directors and its many stakeholders to support... Read More →
avatar for Necole Sommersell

Necole Sommersell

Manager, Evaluation & Impact, Research Manitoba
Necole is the Manager, Evaluation & Impact and plays a key role in monitoring, evaluating and reporting on the progress and impact of the Research Manitoba’s efforts to advance research in the province.


Wednesday November 7, 2018 4:15pm - 5:00pm
Delta Hotel - Joliet-Frontenac

4:15pm

(45 min) The Logic of Inclusive Innovation: From Inputs to Outcomes / La logique derrière l'innovation inclusive : des contributions aux résultats (45 min)
Organized by: OCAD University, Robert Luke

What is inclusive innovation? How do we achieve it?
These are important questions to ask as we continue to pivot into a knowledge based global economy. Inclusive innovation is a worthy outcome to strive for. But in order to achieve it, we need to ensure that the inputs are inclusive. We can usefully plot this into a logic model, which provides a way for understanding the relationships between the various inputs, activities and outputs that will help us achieve the outcome(s) commensurate with the focus on inclusive innovation.

When we look at innovation through this lens and work back from the goal of inclusive innovation we can see that there are gaps in the material conditions that would support the outcome of inclusive innovation. Innovation inputs usefully include the pipeline of science and technology and research and development (S&T and R&D), funding, people, culture, activities: those conditions and material supports that are put into play against any innovation effort.

Inclusive innovation means focusing not just on simple to count measures such as patents and publications, but on the full spectrum of innovation outputs.
  • We need to ask: whose perspective has been left out of innovation?
  • What activities and disciplines are needed to facilitate innovation?
  • What outputs result from these inputs?
When we look at innovation through this lens and work back from the goal of inclusive innovation we can see that there are gaps in the material conditions that would support the outcome of inclusive innovation.

The authors in this series offer helpful advice, expertise and perspectives on inclusive innovation.
  • Dori Tunstall, Dean of Design, OCAD University, on BIPOC entrepreneurship (and Black Panther!)
  • Malavika Kumaran, Senior Associate, Research, MaRS Data Catalyst, on women in tech
  • Ken Doyle, Executive Director of TechAccess Canada on later-stage applied R&D and experimental development in support of diversity of activity
  • Dominique Bérubé, Vice-President, Research Programs, SSHRC will address the role of humanities and social sciences in addressing grand challenges and multidisciplinary research.
Inclusive innovation is a worthy outcome to strive for. In order to achieve it, we need to ensure that the inputs, activities and outputs are inclusive. When we do so, we leverage the full spectrum of capacity from across society, and help to build more resilient social, cultural and economic outcomes.


Moderators
avatar for Robert Luke

Robert Luke

Vice-President, Research & Innovation, and Associate Professor in the Faculty of Liberal Arts & Sciences and School of Interdisciplinary Studies at OCAD University
Robert Luke, PhD, is Vice-President, Research & Innovation, and Associate Professor in the Faculty of Liberal Arts & Sciences and School of Interdisciplinary Studies at OCAD University. His expertise is in human-centered knowledge media design, working at the intersections of education... Read More →

Speakers
avatar for Dominique Bérubé

Dominique Bérubé

Vice-President, Research Programs, Social Sciences and Humanities Research Council
Dominique Bérubé was appointed vice-president, Research Programs, at SSHRC in October 2015. Prior to joining SSHRC, Dominique worked at the Université de Montréal, beginning in 2007. There, she held a variety of positions, including acting vice-rector, Research; associate vice-rector... Read More →
avatar for Ken Doyle

Ken Doyle

Executive Director, TechAccess Canada
As Executive Director of Tech-Access Canada, the national network of Canada's 30 Technology Access Centres (TACs), Ken is responsible for ensuring the network achieves its mandate of facilitating the sharing of best practices between member TACs, and promoting the adoption of comparable... Read More →
avatar for Malavika Kumaran

Malavika Kumaran

Research Manager, MaRS Data Catalyst
As Research Manager, MaRS Data Catalyst, Malavika is responsible for the design and delivery of research projects that align with the objectives of the Innovation Economy stream, using data to provide better insights on entrepreneurship, as a tool to tackle systems barriers, and to... Read More →
avatar for Dori Tunstall

Dori Tunstall

Dean of Design, OCAD University
Elizabeth (Dori) Tunstall is a design anthropologist, public intellectual, and design advocate who works at the intersections of critical theory, culture, and design. As Dean of Design at Ontario College of Art and Design University, she is the first black and black female dean of... Read More →


Wednesday November 7, 2018 4:15pm - 5:00pm
Delta Ottawa - Capitale

5:00pm

CSPC 2018 Opening Reception
Wednesday November 7, 2018 5:00pm - 6:00pm
Delta Ottawa - Pinnacle

6:00pm

Keynote Session - New directions for science advice in federal government
Artificial intelligence...Blockchain...CRISPR-cas9... these are just the ABCs of a broad array of emerging technologies confronting federal decision-makers, who must weigh how to foster these technologies in the interests of Canada’s economic competitiveness but also regulate them in the public interest. Similarly, new ideas such as inclusive innovation, open science, digital governance, collaborative research infrastructures, and the inclusion of traditional Indigenous knowledge present both opportunities and challenges to government departments. Meanwhile the broader context is characterized by rising populism, changing citizen expectations, and a post-truth decline of deference to experts. In this context, timely science advice remains a critical input to agile public policy. As part of the Government of Canada’s new vision for science, federal departments and agencies are identifying Departmental Science Advisors (DSAs) to support effective decision-making informed by the  scientific evidence. Join us for a dialogue with three DSAs on the new directions for science advice in the federal government.

Speakers
avatar for Toby Fyfe

Toby Fyfe

President of Institute on Governance
avatar for Sarah Gallagher

Sarah Gallagher

Canadian Space Agency Science Advisor
avatar for Dr. Donna Kirkwood

Dr. Donna Kirkwood

Chief Scientist, Natural Resources Canada
As Chief Scientist for Natural Resources Canada, Donna plays a leadership role on developing, advancing and promoting the department’s overarching S&T priorities as aligned with the Government’s Science and Innovation agenda. To this end, Donna Kirkwood works closely with NRCan’s... Read More →
avatar for Dan Wayner

Dan Wayner

Chief Science Advisor, National Research Council


Wednesday November 7, 2018 6:00pm - 7:30pm
Delta Ottawa, International Ballroom

9:00pm

Special CSPC 2018 Pub Night Party
Wednesday November 7, 2018 9:00pm - 11:30pm
LIFE RESTO LOUNGE
 
Thursday, November 8
 

7:45am

Breakfast Session - Skills and competencies where science and policy meet - MITACS Science Policy Fellows Special Panel
Policy-making is a complex process involving multiple considerations and competing priorities. Ensuring that science and evidence underpin policy-making can be a challenge both for those seeking to influence policy, and for those making policy decisions. What are the skills and competencies needed to navigate this process? What steps can be taken to enhance the capacity of an organization to integrate science in policy-making processes? Join Mitacs, and a panel of experts to explore Canada’s approach to building science policy capacity.  

Speakers
avatar for Alejandro Adem

Alejandro Adem

Chief Executive Officer and Scientific Director, Mitacs Inc.
Alejandro Adem has been Chief Executive Officer and Scientific Director of Mitacs since February 1, 2015. He is concurrently Professor of Mathematics at the University of British Columbia.As CEO of Mitacs, Professor Adem has overseen an unprecedented expansion of its programs, with... Read More →
avatar for Gail Bowkett

Gail Bowkett

Director, Innovation Policy, Mitacs Inc.
Gail Bowkett is the Director, Innovation Policy at Mitacs. With over 20 years’ experience in the fields of higher education and international development, Gail provides leadership on policy research and analysis in support of Mitacs priorities and programming. Gail's experience... Read More →
avatar for Dr. David Castle

Dr. David Castle

Vice-President Research and a Professor in the School of Public Administration with an adjunct appointment in the Gustavson School of Business
Dr. David Castle is Vice-President Research and a Professor in the School of Public Administration with an adjunct appointment in the Gustavson School of Business. His research focuses on social aspects of life science innovation including science policy, democratic engagement, regulation... Read More →
avatar for Scott Findlay

Scott Findlay

Professor, Department of Biology at the University of Ottawa; Director of Graduate Studies at the Institute of Environment
Scott Findlay is Professor in the Department of Biology at the University of Ottawa and Director of Graduate Studies at the Institute of Environment. His main research interests concern human impacts on ecosystems, evidence-informed decision-making, integration of indigenous and western... Read More →
avatar for Katie Gibbs

Katie Gibbs

A scientist, organizer and advocate for science and evidence-based policies
Katie Gibbs is a scientist, organizer and advocate for science and evidence-based policies. While completing her Ph.D. at the University of Ottawa in Biology, she was one of the lead organizers of the ‘Death of Evidence’—one of the largest science rallies in Canadian history... Read More →


Thursday November 8, 2018 7:45am - 8:30am
Delta Ottawa, International Ballroom

8:30am

(90 min) Granting agencies and participatory science in Canada / Organismes subventionnaires et science participative au Canada
Organized by: Fonds de recherche du Québec, Fanny Magini

Canadian granting agencies are increasingly interested in strengthening the link between science and society. This link can take various forms, including that of participatory science, in which non-expert citizens are involved in the research process. The Chief Scientist of Québec would like to organize a panel to discuss the role of granting agencies in the funding of participatory science in Canada and the role of citizens in the research process. Panelists will answer questions such as: Do granting agencies already support this type of research? Are there specific research programs to promote and recognize participatory science? Beyond research programming, should citizens have a place on evaluation committees, boards of directors of granting agencies, or other official bodies?

Moderators
avatar for Véronique Morin

Véronique Morin

Science Journalist
Véronique Morin is a science journalist in broadcast and print magazines with over 25 years experience who believes strongly that Science should have an important place in daily newscasts.For the past seven years, she has worked for the science magazine program “Le Code Chastenay” on the pub... Read More →

Speakers
avatar for Dr. Marc Fortin

Dr. Marc Fortin

Vice-President, Research and Partnerships, Natural Sciences and Engineering Research Council of Canada
Marc Fortin is Vice-President of Research Partnerships at the Natural Sciences and Engineering ResearchCouncil of Canada (NSERC). Dr Fortin is responsible for several programs designed to stimulate researchpartnerships, innovation and the training of the generation of research and... Read More →
avatar for Ted Hewitt

Ted Hewitt

President, Social Sciences and Humanities Research Council
Dr. W. E. (Ted) Hewitt is President of the Social Sciences and Humanities Research Council of Canada. Between 2012 and 2015, he was Executive Vice-President at the Council. Since 1989, he has been Professor of Sociology at the University of Western Ontario, in London Canada, and in... Read More →
avatar for Serge Marchand

Serge Marchand

Directeur scientifique, The Fonds de recherche du Québec – Santé (FRQS)
Jusqu'à sa nomination à titre de directeur scientifique du Fonds de recherche du Québec – Santé, Serge Marchand était professeur titulaire au département de chirurgie - service de neurochirurgie de l'Université de Sherbrooke. À titre de chercheur, il est rattaché au Centre... Read More →
avatar for Louise Poissant

Louise Poissant

Directrice scientifique, Le Fonds de recherche du Québec – Société et culture (FRQSC)
Louise Poissant est titulaire d'un doctorat en philosophie à l'Université de Montréal. Après avoir enseigné au département de communication de l'Université d'Ottawa, elle a occupé le poste de professeure titulaire à l'École des arts visuels et médiatiques de l'UQAM pendant... Read More →
avatar for Dr. Michael J. Strong

Dr. Michael J. Strong

President, Canadian Institutes of Health Research
Dr. Michael J. Strong is Dean of the Schulich School of Medicine & Dentistry and Distinguished University Professor at Western University. He also holds the Arthur J. Hudson Chair in ALS Research. He undertook his undergraduate training in biochemistry and medicine at Queens University... Read More →


Thursday November 8, 2018 8:30am - 10:00am
Delta Ottawa, International Ballroom

10:00am

Coffee Break
Thursday November 8, 2018 10:00am - 10:30am
Delta Ottawa, International Ballroom

10:30am

(45 min) Canada 2067 – Lessons learned in building a national vision for STEM education / Canada 2067 – leçons tirées de la définition d'une vision nationale de l'enseignement des STIM
Organized by: Let's Talk Science, Bonnie Schmidt

The panel will discuss key recommendations and lessons learned through Canada 2067, a unique and ambitious national initiative to forge a “made in Canada” action plan for the future of youth science, technology, engineering and math (STEM) education.

Canada’s complex education ecosystem demands creative solutions to catalyze large-scale change that can benefit all students.  Canada 2067 responded to this need for creativity through the convening of: five summits with high school students; seven Global Shapers’ roundtables with young adults; a national leadership conference that included federal and provincial governments and diverse stakeholders; and a social media campaign that resulted in input from hundreds of thousands of Canadians.

Through this process, Canada 2067’s collaborative vision and five-year goals reflect the varied perspectives of students, millennials, educators, parents and the general public as well as policy makers, industry, community organizations and global education researchers.  The vision and goals address six areas that were found to align in global research into STEM education policy initiatives published over the past ten years.  

Having successfully positioned Canada as a world leader in education at the start of the 21st century, our schools are now working to ensure that this advantage is maintained, not only in the near future, but in decades to come. Increasingly, this means graduating students with a diverse set of skills that go beyond disciplinary knowledge to include those related to critical thinking, problem-solving, creativity, and communication.  What types of supports and partnerships do our schools need to ensure that they are successful in this endeavour? How supportive is the public of a new vision for education that emphasizes critical thinking over rote learning and a multi-disciplinary approach over traditional subjects?  This panel will explore these questions and more by outlining the rationale for Canada 2067, summarizing key recommendations, and ultimately addressing the issue of how schools can help to fuel Canada’s innovation agenda.


Moderators
avatar for Bonnie Schmidt

Bonnie Schmidt

Founder and President, Let's Talk Science
Dr. Bonnie Schmidt, C.M. is the founder and president of Let’s Talk Science, an award-winning, national charitable organization that she started in 1991 while completing a Ph.D. in Physiology. Let’s Talk Science helps children and youth fulfill their potential and prepare for... Read More →

Speakers
avatar for Rob Mariani

Rob Mariani

Senior Vice President, GM Ottawa, Hill + Knowlton Strategies Canada
Rob is a strong believer in the power of engaging people in decisions that affect them most, having applied his passion and expertise on projects for business, government and not-for profits. He is committed to helping organizations build sustainable decisions to complex issues through... Read More →
avatar for Rohan Nuttall

Rohan Nuttall

Research Assistant at the Urban Predictive Analytics Lab, University of British Columbia
Rohan is currently a Research Assistant with the Urban Predictive Analytics Lab at UBC, workingon data models and visualization for smart cities. He completed his undergraduate thesis inexperimental particle physics with the Rare Decay Research Group, has worked for TRIUMF(Canada’s... Read More →
avatar for Andrew Parkin

Andrew Parkin

Director, Mowat Centre
Andrew Parkin is the Director of the Mowat Centre, an independent public policy think tank located atthe Munk School of Global Affairs and Public Policy at the University of Toronto and Ontario’s non-partisan, evidence-based voice on public policy. The Mowat Centre undertakes collaborative... Read More →
avatar for Ruth Silver

Ruth Silver

Founder, Groundswell Projects
With a BA in Fine Art/Indigenous Studies from McMaster University and a Master’s degree from theHarvard Graduate School of Design, Ruth SIlver has worked with the likes of Annie Liebovitz, Bruce Mau,Urban Strategies and Decode before founding Groundswell Projects in 2013. Ruth has... Read More →


Thursday November 8, 2018 10:30am - 11:15am
Delta Ottawa - Chaudière

10:30am

(90 min) Risk Communication and Engagement with the Public in the Nuclear, Climate and Artificial Intelligence Sectors / Communication des risques et engagement auprès du public dans les secteurs du nucléaire, du climat et de l'intelligence artificielle
Organzied by: MITACS Science Policy Fellowships, April Killikelly

The connection between policymakers, scientists and the public is an essential bond that allows scientific innovation to translate into tangible benefit in the life of ordinary Canadians. And yet, we are increasingly seeing different perceptions over the nature, extent and capacity to mitigate potential risk and this is translating into protracted controversies that may actually put the public at risk – think nuclear waste management, climate change or artificial intelligence.

Speakers
avatar for Duane Bratt

Duane Bratt

Professor and Chair, Department of Economics, Justice, and Policy Studies, Mount Royal University
Duane Bratt is a political science Professor and Chair in the Department of Economics, Justice, and Policy Studies at Mount Royal University (Calgary, Alberta). He was educated at the Universities of Windsor (BA 1991, MA 1992) and Alberta (Ph.D 1996). He teaches in the area of international... Read More →
avatar for Elaine Chatigny

Elaine Chatigny

Assistant Deputy Minister, Public Health Agency of Canada
avatar for Monica Gattinger

Monica Gattinger

Director, Institute for Science, Society and Policy
Monica Gattinger is Director of the Institute for Science, Society and Policy, Full Professor at the School of Political Studies and Chair of Positive Energy at the University of Ottawa. Professor Gattinger’s research and engagement focus on strengthening governance, public policy... Read More →
avatar for Dr. Kimberly Girling

Dr. Kimberly Girling

Policy Analyst, Innovation, Science and Economic Development Canada
Kimberly Girling holds a PhD in Neuroscience from the University of British Columbia, whereshe studied new therapeutics for Huntington's Disease, a neurodegenerative illness.  Kimberlywas a member of the inaugural cohort of the Mitacs Canadian Science Policy Fellowship.Through the fellowship, she was positioned with Defence Research and Development where sheworked to identify ethical challenges of emerging techno... Read More →
avatar for Margot Hurlbert

Margot Hurlbert

Fellow of the Earth Systems Governance Project; Lead of the Science, Technology and Innovation Research Cluster at Johnson Shoyama Graduate School of Public Policy (JSGS)
Margot has a B. Admin. (Great Distinction) from the University of Regina (1985), an LL.B. (Osgoode) (1987), an LL.M. (Osgoode) (2005) in Constitutional Law with a focus on energy, natural resource, indigenous and environmental issues, and a Ph.D. (University of Amsterdam) in Social... Read More →
avatar for Bob Watts

Bob Watts

Senior Associate, Consensus Building Institute
Bob Watts has been involved in many major Indigenous issues in Canada over the past 20 years and led the process, with support from across Canada and internationally, to establish Canada’s Truth and Reconciliation Commission, which is examining and will make recommendations regarding... Read More →


Thursday November 8, 2018 10:30am - 12:00pm
Delta Hotel - Joliet-Frontenac

10:30am

(90 min)Water at the science-policy interface: Challenges and opportunities for Canada
Organized by: The University of Waterloo, Tatjana Milojevic and Nancy Goucher

Optimum management of water resources is one of the most crucial challenges for Canada in the 21st Century. Safe and adequate water supply is central to sustainable ecosystems, healthy communities and strong economic growth. However, a widening gap between current management practices and increasing scientific knowledge is testing the adequacy of the current regulatory framework in addressing threats to water, such as those posed by nonpoint source contamination. As climate change increases the uncertainty and complexity for the management of water resources, water managers and researchers will need to understand more about the science-policy interface to improve the response to water threats. These threats demand a new approach to regulation for water protection and water management activities, which require adaptive responses. There is considerable variation in our current knowledge of the changing demands on water resources and in the different stages of adaptive management strategies, which might be improved by implementing water monitoring policies and plans.

This panel examines the perceptions of researchers and water managers working at the science–policy interface across Canada and discusses the implications of their role for addressing nonpoint source contamination in the face of climate change. Our discussion themes include: vulnerability and uncertainty, time lag issues, the need for different skill sets throughout the process, and what can be done to enable scientists and policymakers to work together more effectively to address current and  future water threats.


Moderators
avatar for Homa Kheyrollah Pour

Homa Kheyrollah Pour

Research Scientist, University of Waterloo
Dr. Kheyrollah Pour received her Ph.D. degree from the University of Waterloo, Waterloo, Canada in 2015. She worked as a Researcher with the Science and Technology Branch, Environment and Climate Change Canada, Toronto. Currently, she is an adjunct Professor at the University of Waterloo... Read More →

Speakers
avatar for Philippe Van Cappellen

Philippe Van Cappellen

Canada Excellence Research Chair in Ecohydrology Laureate
Dr. Van Cappellen joined the University of Waterloo in 2011 as the Canada Excellence Research Chair in Ecohydrology. Van Cappellen’s research group carries out fundamental and applied research in support of the sustainable use of water resources, that is, one that balances society’s... Read More →
avatar for Steve Cobham

Steve Cobham

Manager of Canada-U.S. Relations in the International Affairs Branch, Environment and Climate Change Canada
Steve joined Environment Canada in April 2004 as a water policy specialist in the Environmental Conservation Service, following positions where he worked on international water and sustainable development issues with Industry Canada and the Department of Foreign Affairs and International... Read More →
avatar for Nicola Crawhall

Nicola Crawhall

Principal, Westbrook Public Affairs
Nicola is principal of Westbrook Public Affairs, which provides government relations services, project management, strategic communications, and policy support services primarily in the areas of local government, infrastructure and environmental services. Nicola has over 25 years... Read More →
avatar for Gail Krantzberg

Gail Krantzberg

Professor of Engineering and Public Policy in the Walter G Booth School of Engineering Practice and Technology, McMaster University
Dr. Krantzberg is Professor with the Engineering and Public Policy Programs in the School of Engineering Practise and Technology at McMaster University offering Canada’s first Master’s Degree in Engineering and Public Policy. Gail completed her M.Sc. and Ph.D. at the University... Read More →
avatar for Alain Pietroniro

Alain Pietroniro

Executive Director for the National Hydrological Service within the Meteorological Service of Canada, Environment and Climate Change Canada
Dr. Pietroniro is currently the Executive director for the National Hydrological Service within the Meteorological Service of Canada which includes managing the Water Survey of Canada.  Current duties include managing the operation of the WSC which include over 2300 hydrometric stations... Read More →


Thursday November 8, 2018 10:30am - 12:00pm
Delta Ottawa - Capitale

10:30am

(90 min) Fake News, Fake Therapies: Upping the Ante in the Fight Against Unproven Stem Cell Therapies in Canada / Fausses nouvelles, faux traitements : soulever la barre dans la lutte contre les traitements à base de cellules souches non éprouvés au Canad
Organized by: Stem Cell Network, Lisa Willemse

Stem cell research is an exciting field of science and holds much promise for the treatment of chronic illnesses and diseases. However, stem cell research is complex and there is much to learn before stem cell-based treatments will be ready for routine clinical use. Today, there are very few stem cell therapies offered by medical professionals as the standard care of practice. Despite this, private clinics worldwide – and increasingly here in Canada – market stem cell-based therapies to people who are vulnerable and seeking relief for a variety of conditions, from arthritis to stroke.  Regulatory loopholes have allowed these clinics to expand in many jurisdictions.  Recent studies show that the global market for unproven therapies is $2.4B, with 60,000 patients purchasing treatments each year. Nearly 800 clinics are operating in the United States alone, it is unclear how many are operating in Canada.

These treatments come with high financial costs, little to no medical follow-up, and the risk of adverse outcomes. None have been proven to be effective through clinical trials, the medical gold standard required to determine both safety and efficacy. Nor do these clinics publish their methods or outcomes in peer-reviewed journals, relying instead on anecdotal evidence and patient testimonials to support their claims. By preying upon the hopes of desperate patients, unregulated stem cell clinics are making very tidy profits.

Led by the Stem Cell Network, the stem cell research community has been working nationally and alongside international partners to better understand the issue and provide guidance that fit social, legal and political frameworks. With limited resources dedicated to the massive effort required to effectively debunk existing myths and communicate the risks to the public, scientists are facing a losing battle. Action is needed and Canada is well positioned to become a leader for the world in responding to this growing industry and its unethical practices.  However, to meet the challenge head-on a coordinated effort is required; one that sees the science community, patient groups, health care providers, media and government all playing their respective part to increase awareness of fake or risky therapies.
With reference to a paper detailing the outcomes of a 2017 workshop (publication expected summer/fall 2018), this panel will explore the current state of the issue in Canada and provide insights on what they believe is needed to mitigate the proliferation of a new market that is offering unproven and risky treatments to the general public.


Speakers
avatar for Harold Atkins

Harold Atkins

Physician, Ottawa Hospital Blood and Marrow Transplant Program
Harold Atkins MD is a physician of the Ottawa Hospital Blood and Marrow Transplant Program, an Associate Professor of Medicine at the University of Ottawa, a scientist in the Center for Innovative Cancer Research and the medical director of the Regenerative Medicine Program at the... Read More →
avatar for Torah Kachur

Torah Kachur

Columnist, CBC Radio One
Torah Kachur is the syndicated science columnist for more than 20 local afternoon shows on CBC Radio One and is a Sessional Lecturer in Cell Biology and Genetics at the University of Alberta. She has a range of science communication experience including host of a 2014 national summer... Read More →
avatar for Jennifer Molson

Jennifer Molson

Research Assistant, Ages Cancer Assessment Clinic, Ottawa Hospital
Jennifer Molson was diagnosed with Relapsing Remitting Multiple Sclerosis at the age of 21 in 1996.  Six years later, after multiple failed therapies, she took part in a stem cell clinical trial at the Ottawa Hospital funded by the MS Society Scientific Research Foundation. The procedure... Read More →
avatar for Cate Murray

Cate Murray

Executive Director & COO, Stem Cell Network
Cate Murray assumed the role of Executive Director & COO of the Stem Cell Network in 2017. She has over two decades of experience working in public policy, strategic communications, and government relations. Cate has a proven track record of helping national research organizations... Read More →
avatar for Amy Zarzeczny

Amy Zarzeczny

Associate Professor and Graduate Chair, Johnson Shoyama Graduate School of Public Policy, University of Regina
Amy Zarzeczny is an Associate Professor, Graduate Chair, and the Centre for the Study of Science and Innovation Policy (CSIP) Health Innovation Research Cluster Lead with the Johnson Shoyama Graduate School of Public Policy, University of Regina campus. After completing law school... Read More →


Thursday November 8, 2018 10:30am - 12:00pm
Delta Hotel - Richelieu

10:30am

(90 min) Failure to Thrive: Why Canada Struggles to Grow World Leading Tech Companies / Retard de croissance : pourquoi le Canada éprouve-t-il des difficultés à développer des entreprises de haute technologie de calibre mondial
Organized by: Council of Canadian Academies, Weronika Zych 

For more than 100 years, successive Canadian governments have bemoaned the country’s inability to grow firms into large, globally successful industry leaders. While much effort has been expended to address this issue, the results have been middling by most informed accounts. Indeed, over the last decade, several large-scale tech companies that Canada has grown have failed to thrive. That said, Canadians have become expert at describing the host of explanations behind the phenomenon: technical and management skills gaps, weak IP policies, inadequate venture capital, too much (or not enough) tax support, small domestic markets, and other factors. But we have not been equally proficient at identifying the causes and consequences of this failure to grow robust domestic tech companies in Canada. Perhaps a different approach is needed, with a different set of questions: Does it matter that Canada does not grow firms into large industry leaders? Do Canadians really want to scale companies? Or are we content attracting foreign subsidiaries with world leading research capacity and infrastructure, and exporting ideas and innovations to be developed in other markets? The panel includes industry and policy leaders, who will draw on current evidence and their own experiences to debate the causes and consequences of Canada’s failure to thrive and what steps (if any) should be taken.


Moderators
avatar for Eric M. Meslin, Ph.D., FCAHS

Eric M. Meslin, Ph.D., FCAHS

President and CEO, Council of Canadian Academies
Eric M. Meslin is President and CEO of the Council of Canadian Academies (CCA). He joined the CCA inFebruary, 2016, bringing with him more than 25 years of experience in science policy in both universityand government settings.Dr. Meslin came to the CCA from Indiana University (IU... Read More →

Speakers
LC

Lisa Crossley

CEO, Reliq Health Technologies, Inc.
Dr. Crossley is an accomplished healthcare technology executive with a proven track record of successfully building and leading global tech companies. She has diverse experience across multiple market segments, including healthcare information technology, therapeutics, medical devices... Read More →
avatar for Pierre Lortie, C.M., FCAE

Pierre Lortie, C.M., FCAE

Senior Business Advisor, Dentons LLP
Pierre Lortie is a Senior Business Advisor at Dentons Canada LLP. He is also a Director of ECN Capital Corp. Pierre is a Director of the Research Center of the McGill University Health Center; Director of the Montreal Cancer Institute; Director of the Marine Biotechnology Research... Read More →
avatar for Judy Fairburn, FCAE

Judy Fairburn, FCAE

Board Director, Public Policy Forum, Sustainable Development Technology Canada, Tundra Oil & Gas Inc., Veerum Inc., and Calgary Economic Development
Ms. Fairburn is a champion for Canadian innovation with diverse experience across the corporate, entrepreneurial and government/policy realms.  She proudly serves on the boards of the Public Policy Forum, Sustainable Development Technology Canada, Tundra Oil & Gas Inc., Veerum Inc... Read More →
avatar for Victoria Lennox

Victoria Lennox

Co-Founder and CEO, Start-Up Canada
An entrepreneur with a track record of architecting and mobilizing networks, organizations, policy environments and programming, Victoria Lennox has propelled Canada onto the global stage as an ‘Innovation Nation’, as one of Canada’s leading proponents of entrepreneurship and... Read More →
avatar for Iain Stewart

Iain Stewart

President, National Research Council
Iain Stewart was appointed President of the National Research Council (NRC) effective August 24, 2016.Prior to that, Mr. Stewart served as Associate Secretary of the Treasury Board of Canada from July 2015to August 2016, and Assistant Secretary of the International Affairs, Security... Read More →


Thursday November 8, 2018 10:30am - 12:00pm
Delta Ottawa, International Ballroom

11:15am

(45 min) Supporting the next generation of northern scientists / Appuyer la prochaine génération de scientifiques dans le Nord
Organized by: Polar Knowledge Canada, Jennifer Sokol

The planet is changing rapidly and nowhere more so than in the Arctic, where a warming climate is already bringing a multitude of environmental, social and economic consequences. This is raising a lot of questions about what the future is going to look like, how to prepare and the type of research and knowledge necessary to address these changes.   This panel will discuss opportunities to grow the base of northern scientists, including Indigenous researchers, across the North. Too often, northerners are participants within Arctic science but not recognized as knowledge holders and researchers themselves. Despite a renewed focus on Indigenous Knowledge systems, few Indigenous researchers are being acknowledged and accredited for their contributions. Northern-based educational institutions and universities that use pedagogical approaches in line with the cultural contexts of the north could help increase the number of northern researchers. During this panel, we will hear from a diverse range of voices including educators, northern youth, and institutions; all working to engage northern Indigenous communities in research.
Hosted by Polar Knowledge Canada, the panel will discuss questions including the following: what tools and support systems are needed to encourage northern youth towards research careers? How can we better reflect Indigenous knowledge and approaches in research? What barriers do northern students face in entering a science career and higher education? What kinds of policy, programming, and coordination are needed to address these barriers, improve northern self- determination in research, and northern research capacity?

Polar Knowledge Canada's mission is to advance Canada’s knowledge of the Arctic and other circumpolar regions including the Antarctic, and strengthen Canadian leadership in polar science and technology, while promoting the development and distribution of knowledge, across the north.


Moderators
avatar for Jennifer Sokol

Jennifer Sokol

Senior Policy Advisor, Polar Knowledge Canada

Speakers
avatar for Joanna Laskey

Joanna Laskey

Director, Pilimmaksaivik (Federal Centre of Excellence, Inuit Employment in Nunavut)
Joanna Laskey is the Director of a new whole-of-government federal office based in Iqaluit, Nunavut: Pilimmaksaivik (Federal Centre of Excellence for Inuit Employment in Nunavut). Pilimmaksaivik is an Inuktitut word chosen by federal Inuit employees, translating roughly to ‘a place... Read More →
avatar for David Silas

David Silas

First Nations Engagement Advisor, Yukon College
David Silas is from a small un-incorporated First Nation community of Pelly Crossing and is located in central Yukon Territory; David is a member of the Wolf Clan and a part of the Selkirk First Nation. He is a from the Northern Tutchone language group. David has recently finished... Read More →
avatar for Kelsey Wrightson

Kelsey Wrightson

Director of Policy and Programming, Dechinta Centre for Research and Learning
Dr. Kelsey Wrightson is the Director of Policy and Programming at the Dechinta Centre for Research and Learning. Kelsey grew up in Edmonton Alberta, and completed her PhD at the University of British Columbia in 2015. She held a post-doctoral position at Queen’s University in the... Read More →
avatar for Krista Zawadski

Krista Zawadski

Curator of Inuit Art, Department of Culture and Heritage, Government of Nunavut


Thursday November 8, 2018 11:15am - 12:00pm
Delta Ottawa - Chaudière

12:30pm

1:30pm

(45 min) Science and Inclusivity: Going Beyond the Slogans / Science et inclusion : au-delà des slogans
Organized by: Deborah Currie, Director, SHAD Fellow Network

Everybody’s talking about inclusion – and ensuring that Canadians from every sector have opportunities to excel in STEM or now STEAM. That's a good thing. But if inclusion is going to be about more than photo-ops and catchphrases, we have to have real discussions about the challenges of genuine, deep inclusion. Meaningful gender, economic, regional, and philosophical diversity are easy to talk about but tough to achieve in any organization – even in entrepreneurial settings where diversity is widely known to be an engine for creativity. SHAD, Canada’s premier entrepreneurship program empowering high school aged youth to become change-makers, was established in 1980 and is based in Waterloo, Ontario. For this panel discussion SHAD will present four young SHAD Fellows from diverse backgrounds who will address diversity and inclusion from their own perspectives and experiences, and whose stories show why it’s critical to get it right.

Moderators
avatar for Tim Jackson

Tim Jackson

President and Chief Executive Officer, SHAD
Tim Jackson is the President and Chief Executive Officer of SHAD. Tim joined SHAD in July 2016 after serving as an Executive Vice-President at the MaRS Discovery District, one of the world’s largest urban innovation hubs. Tim has an extensive background as an entrepreneur and business... Read More →

Speakers
avatar for Alex Bouchard

Alex Bouchard

Inaugural Member of the Prime Minister's Youth Council and SHAD 2009
Alex Bouchard is from Haines Junction, Yukon, and is a proud francophone who was involved with the Fédération de la Jeunesse Canadienne Française. She founded the University of British Columbia Parks Canada Club while attending university and inspired youth to get outdoors and... Read More →
avatar for James Flynn

James Flynn

SHAD Fellow and Rhodes Scholar
James Flynn is a Rhodes Scholar with interests in digital literacy and economic development. James is currently a Juris Doctor candidate at the University of Toronto Faculty of Law. He also holds Master of Business Administration and Master of Science degrees from the University... Read More →
avatar for Eva Greyeyes

Eva Greyeyes

SHAD Fellow 2018
Eva Greyeyes is currently a grade 11 student in Toronto beginning the IB Diploma Programme at Branksome Hall. She is Nêhiyaw from Muskeg Lake Cree Nation.She has been actively involved in the performing arts from an early age. Eva has acted professionally in theatre and in the 2018... Read More →
avatar for Joseph Tafese

Joseph Tafese

Student, University of Waterloo
Joseph Tafese attended SHAD in 2017 and received the Dave Black Award for Excellence in Innovation and Entrepreneurship. After moving to Canada from Ethiopia, Joseph decided to invest the only thing he had – time – on the inner-city children he lived with. He became a Sunday School... Read More →


Thursday November 8, 2018 1:30pm - 2:15pm
Delta Ottawa - Capitale

1:30pm

(90 min) Making Science Matter: Overcoming barriers to knowledge mobilization and science communication
Organized by: NIVA Inc. - Sean Young-Steinberg

Hi there Ms. Scientist, that looks like some interesting work you are doing there - but please help me
understand: what does it really mean, who is implicated, and why should Canadians care? So, Mr.
Researcher, you say those are some important results, but how can this information be put into use if
it is just sitting there, buried in a journal article that policy makers or other stakeholders won’t read,
nor comprehend? How do we put this in an accessible form that will motivate audiences to act on it?

The billions of dollars spent each year in Canada on scientific research and development generates a
tremendous volume of critical new knowledge and information. This includes gaining a better understanding of the world we live in, innovative new technologies that improve our quality of life, and ways to reduce the impact humans are having on the planet. While these efforts all have great merit on their own, without the capacity to effectively transmit this knowledge to the people who are in a position to make decisions or change their behaviours, little to no action will ever come of it.
Mobilizing scientific knowledge, whether from discovery to decision making, findings to funding, or from research to regulation, is no easy task. A key element for engaging, informing, and motivating target audiences is developing high-impact messaging that is clear, simple, and relevant. This approach also includes “knowledge brokering” as a means to bridge these two worlds to ensure that the right information is available to the right people.

More broadly, science communication is essentially distilling complex information into to its key
elements, and translating them into accessible plain language and visual representations that are tailored to specific audiences, to ensure they understand the message you are trying to deliver. These communications must be developed with a deep appreciation of the needs and motivations of a given audience. The use of narratives and storytelling are also key tools to engage and bring an emotional connection to your readers, and for communicating complex subjects to policy-makers and the general public.

With all this being said, there can be significant barriers and challenges that prevent knowledge mobilization and science communication activities from effectively delivering information to the right people at the right time so it can have an impact. What are those barriers, and how can they be overcome? What are some examples of success and failure in this regard? This session will explore how knowledge can be better mobilized and communicated to move people (including policy makers) to action, enable well-informed decisions, and bring it into active use. Successfully making the connections between research/expertise and policy/practice is critical to achieving desired outcomes and this includes building relationships, trust, and understanding between knowledge creators and users.

Moderators
avatar for Anton Holland

Anton Holland

President and CEO, NIVA Inc.
Anton Holland is the President and CEO of NIVA Inc., Canada’s leading consultancy specializing in science, technical, and risk communication. For almost 40 years, NIVA has been helping clients transform complex information into compelling narratives, convert raw knowledge into action... Read More →

Speakers
avatar for Dr. Aline Dimitri

Dr. Aline Dimitri

Executive Director, Food Safety Science Directorate and Deputy Chief Food Safety Officer, Canadian Food Inspection Agency
Dr. Aline Dimitriis the Executive Director of the Food Safety Science Directorate and the Deputy Chief Food Safety Officer at the Canadian Food Inspection Agency (CFIA).Dr. Dimitri is responsible for providing science advice, scientific risk intelligence, and overall science direction... Read More →
avatar for Jim Handman

Jim Handman

Executive Director, Science Media Centre of Canada
Jim Handman is a freelance science journalist, media  trainer, and as of 2017, the executive director of the Science Media Centre of Canada.  For 17 years, Jim was the Executive Producer of  CBC Radio's award-winning science program, Quirks &  Quarks. Jim has also taught broadcast... Read More →
avatar for Purnima Sundar

Purnima Sundar

Director of Knowledge Mobilization, Ontario Centre of Excellence for Child and Youth Mental Health
Purnima Sundar is the Director of Knowledge Mobilization at the Ontario Centre of Excellence for Childand Youth Mental Health. She has over 20 years of experience doing community-based, participatoryaction research and program evaluation in the areas of community mental health anddiversity/multiculturalism... Read More →


Thursday November 8, 2018 1:30pm - 3:00pm
Delta Ottawa - Chaudière

1:30pm

(90 min) Bridging Science and Indigenous Knowledge Systems: Best Practices / Établir un lien entre les systèmes de connaissances scientifiques et de connaissances autochtones : pratiques exemplaires
Organized by: Natural Resources Canada’s Office of the Chief Scientist 

Today’s issues are multi-facetted and complex. Drawing on various sources of evidence can enhance our ability to identify sensible and practical solutions.  Success stories that draw on both science and Indigenous Knowledge systems are often undocumented. Much remains to be done, and discussions of experiences and examples are important for sharing experiential knowledge of the panelists such as lessons learned and best practices.

Moderated by Natural Resources Canada’s Chief Scientist and for the benefit of the Government of Canada’s Science and Policy Integration community, this panel will provide an opportunity for practitioners in various disciplines to present their experiences including both challenges and enablers. Panelists will discuss the results of their work in bridging science and Indigenous knowledge systems for a common purpose such as sustainable environmental and natural resource management. Case studies presented by the panelists will provide participants with examples of successful integration and partnership practices established between governmental organizations and local/regional and Indigenous groups.

This "Case Study" panel would follow the Short Talk-type panel on the same subject, delving deeper by providing ‘grassroots’ perspectives.

Moderators
avatar for Dr. Donna Kirkwood

Dr. Donna Kirkwood

Chief Scientist, Natural Resources Canada
As Chief Scientist for Natural Resources Canada, Donna plays a leadership role on developing, advancing and promoting the department’s overarching S&T priorities as aligned with the Government’s Science and Innovation agenda. To this end, Donna Kirkwood works closely with NRCan’s... Read More →

Speakers
avatar for Leah Braithwaite

Leah Braithwaite

Executive Director, Arctic Net Inc.
Leah is the Executive Director of Arctic Net Inc. She holds an MSc in Environmental Physiology and worked for several federal government Departments including Agriculture Canada, Canadian Space Agency, NSERC, DFO and most recently Environment and Climate Change Canada’s Canadian... Read More →
avatar for Dr. Solange Nadeau

Dr. Solange Nadeau

Senior Forest Sociologist, Canadian Forest Services at Natural Resources Canada
Dr. Solange Nadeau is a Senior Forest Sociologist with the Canadian Forest Services at Natural Resources Canada.With a Ph.D. in Forest Resources from Oregon State University, Dr. Nadeau’s research interests relate to the human dimensions of forestry. Her research focuses on sustainability... Read More →
avatar for Scot Nickels

Scot Nickels

Director, Inuit Qaujisarvingat: The Inuit Knowledge Centre,
Scot is the current Director of the Inuit Qaujisarvingat: The Inuit Knowledge Centre, which focuses on research issues within Inuit Tapiriit Kanatami (ITK). He is responsible for advising the Centre and ITK executive on research and science-related environmental and human health issues... Read More →
avatar for Rachel Olson

Rachel Olson

President and one of the Founding Directors, The Firelight Group
Dr. Rachel Olson is citizen of the Tr’ondek Hwech’in First Nation from the Yukon Territory. Rachel has a PhD in Social Anthropology, and she is currently the President and one of the founding directors of The Firelight Group, a research consultancy that works with Indigenous communities... Read More →


Thursday November 8, 2018 1:30pm - 3:00pm
Delta Hotel - Richelieu

1:30pm

(90 min) Mitigating disruption: integrating social, ethical and policy research into the development of disruptive genomic technologies / Atténuer les perturbations : intégration de la recherche sociale, éthique et politique dans le développement de techn
Organized by: Genome Canada, Rob Annan

Disruptive technologies are double-edged swords. Social media, artificial intelligence (AI), gene editing—all promise enormous economic and social potential. At the same time, they challenge important social norms, policies, and institutions and create unintended and unpredicted consequences.

Society invests significant public resources to support the science and technology that drive these innovations, but invests relatively little to investigate their potential benefits, risks and consequences. Indeed, these are incommensurable – there are no commonly accepted metrics that allow us to evaluate and compare the benefits and risks. Policy makers and the public, faced with rapidly developing technologies, often succumb to reflexive and emotive policy responses.

Since its establishment, Genome Canada has promoted a globally-innovative program (“GE3LS”) to research the ethical, environmental, economic, legal and social issues involved in genomics research. Each large-scale genomics project funded at Genome Canada must integrate a GE3LS research component, promoting a deeper understanding of the broader impact of the research. Dr. Eric Meslin, President of the Council of Canadian Academies and expert on bioethics and science policy, recently led an extensive review of the GE3LS program which identified key lessons for integrating social sciences research into technology development.

Dr. Meslin will chair a session that will explore this topic through two case studies that illustrate how GE3LS works in practice. Each will be co-presented by the project’s genomic and social science researchers who will explain:
- Why it was important to integrate social research into the project;
- The challenges and opportunities this integration presented;
- Expected—and unexpected—benefits observed.

The case studies represent disruptive technological research in genomics. The first describes the development of novel diagnostic technology for breast cancer, the challenges created in supporting informed decision-making by doctors and patients, and the importance of  evaluating the cost-effectiveness of the new technology. The second project focuses on forestry genomics and climate change and integrates research into understanding the ecological, socio-economic and institutional factors that affect the adoption of new technologies in forest management. Both projects are led by internationally-recognized and celebrated Canadian researchers.

Following the case study presentations, Dr. Meslin will moderate a brief discussion between panelists and members of the audience to explore how these case studies might inform the larger context of disruptive technology research, with lessons for ongoing work in artificial intelligence and machine learning, automation and robotics, and beyond.

Moderators
avatar for Eric M. Meslin, Ph.D., FCAHS

Eric M. Meslin, Ph.D., FCAHS

President and CEO, Council of Canadian Academies
Eric M. Meslin is President and CEO of the Council of Canadian Academies (CCA). He joined the CCA inFebruary, 2016, bringing with him more than 25 years of experience in science policy in both universityand government settings.Dr. Meslin came to the CCA from Indiana University (IU... Read More →

Speakers
avatar for Sally Aitken

Sally Aitken

Professor and Associate Dean, Research and Innovation, Faculty of Forestry, University of British Columbia; Director of the Centre for Forest Conservation Genetics
Sally Aitken is a Professor and Associate Dean, Research and Innovation, in the Faculty of Forestry at the University of British Columbia, and Director of the Centre for Forest Conservation Genetics. Sally obtained her PhD from the University of California, Berkeley. Her research... Read More →
avatar for Shannon Hagerman

Shannon Hagerman

Assistant Professor, University of British Columbia
Shannon Hagerman is an Assistant Professor of Social-Ecological Systems in the Department of Forest Resources Management at the University of British Columbia. Her research examines the science-policy-management interface in the context of adapting conservation and resource management... Read More →
avatar for Bartha Maria Knoppers, PhD

Bartha Maria Knoppers, PhD

Professor, McGill University; Canada Research Chair in Law and Medicine; Director of the Centre of Genomics and Policy
Bartha Maria Knoppers, PhD (Comparative Medical Law), is a Full Professor, Canada Research Chair in Law and Medicine and Director of the Centre of Genomics and Policy of the Faculty of Medicine at McGill University. She is the founder of the Public Population Project in Genomics (P3G... Read More →
avatar for Jacques Simard

Jacques Simard

Canadian Research Chair in Oncogenetics; Professor, Department of Molecular Medicine, Université Laval
Jacques Simard, PhD holds a Canadian Research Chair in Oncogenetics since 2001. He is Professor in the Department of Molecular Medicine at Université Laval’s Faculty of Medicine and is a senior scientist at the CHU de Québec - Université Laval Research Center since 1990. He is... Read More →


Thursday November 8, 2018 1:30pm - 3:00pm
Delta Hotel - Joliet-Frontenac

1:30pm

(90 min) Commercializing Innovation in Canada: Retaining human and financial capital north of the border / Commercialiser l'innovation au Canada : cesser d'exporter les ressources humaines et financières au nord de la frontière
Organized by: Ontario Centres of Excellence, Dr. Claudia Krywiak 

Commercializing Innovation in Canada: Retaining human and financial capital north of the border

As host of the second-largest ICT cluster in North America outside Silicon Valley and home to
world-class academic and research institutions focused on innovative technologies, Canada has
a unique opportunity to be a global leader in innovation. Yet some industry and financial experts
have argued there has been a recent trend of investment capital “exodus” to the U.S. that could
result in a cascading loss of talent, intellectual property and the next generation of innovators.
Through a collaborative lens, this diverse panel of research and industry experts will discuss
strategies to link supply with demand to move the best ideas from the lab to the marketplace,
while bringing international visibility to these initiatives that drive economic growth, create high-
quality jobs and enhance Canada’s global competitiveness.

Topics to be discussed:
 Highlights of interconnected, game-changing technology projects already underway,
driving the digital economy
 Moving innovative technologies out of the research lab and into the marketplace
 Attraction and retention of talent
 Connecting supply with demand
 Retention of IP by commercializing in Canada and bringing tech to global markets


Speakers
avatar for Dr. Tom Corr

Dr. Tom Corr

President and Chief Executive Officer, Ontario Centres of Excellence
Dr. Tom Corr: As President and CEO of Ontario Centres of Excellence, Tom brings more than 40 years of experience in the technology transfer, IT and venture capital sectors. He has spent most of his career as an entrepreneur in the ITC sector and has a distinguished academic background... Read More →
avatar for Kathryn Hayashi

Kathryn Hayashi

President and CEO, TRIUMF Innovations
Kathryn Hayashi is President and CEO of TRIUMF Innovations, the business interface and commercialization arm, connecting TRIUMF, Canada's particle accelerator centre, to the private sector via industry partnerships, licensing, and company creation. Ms. Hayashi is a Chartered Professional Accountant with more than 25 years of operational and strategic planning, finance and governance experience in not-for-profit organizations... Read More →
avatar for Audrey Mascarenhas

Audrey Mascarenhas

President and CEO, Questor
Audrey Mascarenhas is President and CEO of Questor, a Calgary-based cleantech company with field offices across North America.A fellow of the Canadian Academy of Engineers, Audrey has worked in energy for over 35 years with Gulf Canada Resources Ltd. and Questor, which was recently... Read More →
avatar for Elissa Strome

Elissa Strome

Executive Director, Pan-Canadian Artificial Intelligence Strategy, Canadian Institute for Advanced Research
Elissa was appointed Executive Director of the Pan-Canadian AI Strategy at CIFAR in January 2018. Currently, she is working with the three AI Institutes in Montreal (MILA), Edmonton (Amii) and Toronto (Vector Institute) to strengthen Canada’s leadership in AI research.Elissa completed... Read More →
avatar for Dr. Zhou Wang

Dr. Zhou Wang

Professor and University Research Chair, University of Waterloo
Dr. Zhou Wang is a Primetime Engineering Emmy Award winner for his ground-breaking contribution tovideo quality assessment. He is a Fellow of IEEE, Royal Society of Canada, and Canadian Academy ofEngineering. He is a University Research Chair and Professor at University of Waterloo... Read More →
avatar for Rodney Wilson

Rodney Wilson

Chief Technologist, Research Networks, Ciena Corporation
Rodney Wilson is responsible for Ciena’s leadership and global interactions with universities and the research community, including national research and education networks. His focus is on collaboration with advanced high-performance networks being created by national governments... Read More →
avatar for Dr. Alan Winter

Dr. Alan Winter

Innovation Commissioner
Dr. Alan Winter is British Columbia’s first Innovation Commissioner. He has wide experience at senior levels in the technology sector and in government, including such roles as the President and CEO of Genome BC from 2001 to 2016, the founding President and CEO of the New Media... Read More →


Thursday November 8, 2018 1:30pm - 3:00pm
Delta Ottawa, International Ballroom

2:15pm

(45 min) Enabling Interdisciplinarity for the Next Generation of Problem Solvers / Favoriser l'interdisciplinarité pour la prochaine génération de solutionneur de problèmes
Organized by: College of New Scholars, Artists and Scientists of the Royal Society of Canada , Steven Cooke

The concept of interdisciplinarity is used to frame education, scholarship, research, and interactions within and outside the academy.  Moreover, given the complexity of problems facing the world today, interdisciplinarity thinking is often considered as "essential" for developing effective solutions.  In principle, the premise of interdisciplinarity is a good one; yet, the extent to which this concept is embraced by the current generation of learners and thinkers, the benefits and risks for doing so, and the barriers and facilitators to achieving interdisciplinarity are rarely considered.  

We contend that emerging scholars, artists and scientists including students, post docs, and early career professionals have much to contribute to discussions about the ways in which interdisciplinarity can be enabled to equip and empower the next generation with the skills and knowledge to work across and among traditional disciplines. Relatedly, there is a need to identify successful examples/case studies of where interdisciplinarity has been achieved with meaningful results.  In this panel session organized by the College of the Royal Society of Canada, we will seek to generate a "Manifesto for Enabling Insterdisciplinarity". To generate the "manifesto" we will collate thoughts from the panel as well as the audience and twitter.  To engage the audience we will distribute cards during the event and collect ideas.  

We will do the same on Twitter for the 24 hrs preceding the session in an attempt to engage the broader community.  

Moderators
avatar for Steven Cooke

Steven Cooke

Canada Research Chair and Professor, Institute of Environmental and Interdisciplinary Sciences at Carleton University
Dr. Steven Cooke is a Canada Research Chair and Professor in the Institute of Environmental and Interdisciplinary Sciences at Carleton University. His work spans the natural and social sciences including several publications on the benefits and challenges of interdisciplinary scholarship... Read More →

Speakers
avatar for Dr. Graeme Auld

Dr. Graeme Auld

Director and Associate Professor, School of Public Policy & Administration, Carleton University
Dr. Graeme Auld is recognized for his work on global environmental policy and politics, especially his examinations of the rise, evolution, and consequences of private certification programs that oversee the authenticity of ethically and environmentally labeled products in global... Read More →
avatar for Dr. Shohini Ghose

Dr. Shohini Ghose

Professor, Physics and Computer Science; Director, Centre for Women in Science (WinS); Vice-President Elect, Canadian Association of Physicists
Dr. Shohini Ghose is a theoretical physicist whose pioneering work in the field of quantum information science and quantum chaos has helped shape the field. She has received numerous awards and recognitions for her scientific breakthroughs, is an internationally sought-after public... Read More →
avatar for Dr. Vivian Nguyen

Dr. Vivian Nguyen

2017-18 Mitacs Canadian Science Policy Fellow, Office of the Chief Scientist at Natural Resources Canada
Dr. Vivian Nguyen is a 2017-18 Mitacs Canadian Science Policy Fellow hosted in the Office of the Chief Scientist at Natural Resources Canada. Her PhD focused on knowledge exchange and mobilization theories in the context of resource management.  She is currently working at Natural... Read More →
avatar for Andrea Reid

Andrea Reid

PhD Candidate, University of British Columbia and Carleton University
Andrea Reid is a PhD Candidate at the University of British Columbia and Carleton University. She is a member of the Nisga’a Nation and a National Geographic Explorer. Her research adopts a social-ecological systems approach to the conservation of wildlife and wild spaces.


Thursday November 8, 2018 2:15pm - 3:00pm
Delta Ottawa - Capitale

3:00pm

Coffee Break
Thursday November 8, 2018 3:00pm - 3:30pm
Delta Ottawa, International Ballroom

3:30pm

(45 min) Connecting Science with Policy in Canada: How do I do it? / Faire un lien entre les sciences et les politiques au Canada: comment je m'y prends?
Organized by: Bird Studies Canada

Scientific knowledge is not easily accessible to policymakers and scientists often do not have a clear understanding of the needs of policymakers. The importance of bridging this gap between science and policy was one of the key topics at the Canadian Science Policy Conference in November 2017. This panel will draw from the insights of experts on the science-policy interface and discuss the following questions:

1. Government policymaker: what avenues does s/he take to obtain scientific advice?

2. NGOs that work towards improving federal science policy (Future Earth and Ecofiscal Commission): how do they connect with policymakers and how do they access scientific information?

3. Scientists who have built successful relationships with policymakers: what was their path to success?

4. Research administrators: what are some options to incorporate time spent on the science-policy interface towards the departmental service component of academics?

5. Office of the Chief Science Advisor, Canada: how do they source scientific information, and what avenues are open to you to influence federal policy? Is there an opportunity for scientists to engage in the process?

This panel is of interest to all of those who are interested in practical guidance for bridging the gap between science and policy. Increasing the role of science in public debates will ultimately improve evidence-based decision-making at the provincial and federal level in Canada. 

Moderators
avatar for Silke Nebel

Silke Nebel

VP Science and Conservation, Bird Studies Canada
Silke Nebel is the VP Science and Conservation with Bird Studies Canada, a national NGO that uses scientific research to inform conservation decisions for birds. She also runs a science communication business (‘Science to Action Consulting’). Prior to starting her own business... Read More →

Speakers
avatar for Mark Daley

Mark Daley

Associate Vice-President (Research), Western University
Mark Daley believes that every problem can be modelled, understood and solvedwith mathematics, and that nature produces the most interesting problems. Beforerunning off to study maths, Mark studied music composition. His family is the mostimportant thing in his life. Mark is Western’s... Read More →
avatar for Scott Findlay

Scott Findlay

Professor, Department of Biology at the University of Ottawa; Director of Graduate Studies at the Institute of Environment
Scott Findlay is Professor in the Department of Biology at the University of Ottawa and Director of Graduate Studies at the Institute of Environment. His main research interests concern human impacts on ecosystems, evidence-informed decision-making, integration of indigenous and western... Read More →
avatar for Amy Luers

Amy Luers

Executive Director, Future Earth
Amy Luers is Executive Director of Future Earth. Previously, she was the Director of Climate at the Skoll Global Threats Fund (SGTF) and Assistant Director for Climate Resilience and Information at the White House Office of Science and Technology Policy (OSTP). Previously, she was... Read More →
avatar for Frederick John Wrona, Ph.D.

Frederick John Wrona, Ph.D.

Chief Scientist, Alberta Environment and Parks
Chief Scientist of Alberta Environment and Parks, Dr. Fred Wrona, is a champion of science, research, and the role of evidence in decision-making. As Chief Scientist, he provides scientific advice to address complex environmental challenges and opportunities facing Alberta and promotes... Read More →
avatar for Christopher Ragan

Christopher Ragan

Director of McGill University's Max Bell School of Public Policy; Associate Professor, Department of Economics at McGill University; Chair of Canada's Ecofiscal Comission
Christopher Ragan is the inaugural Director of McGill University’s Max Bell School of Public Policy and is an Associate Professor in McGill’s Department of Economics. He is the Chair of Canada’s Ecofiscal Commission, which launched in November 2014 with a 5-year horizon to identify... Read More →


Thursday November 8, 2018 3:30pm - 4:15pm
Delta Hotel - Joliet-Frontenac

3:30pm

(45 min) Fueling Water Innovation in Atlantic Canada / Alimenter l'innovation dans le domaine de l'eau dans le Canada Atlantique
Organized by: WWF-Canada, Elizabeth Hendriks

What’s the biggest threat to Canada’s freshwater?  It’s a myth. The one that tells us our water wealth will last forever. The one that says: water, that’s someone else’s problem. The truth is, there is nothing Canadians should take more personally than the health of our waters. Engaged communities ask questions, they seek information, they pay attention to changes in their local, and they hold decision-makers accountable.

For decades, Canada has failed to collect real-information on a regional or national scale about the health of our freshwater ecosystems. The good news is that Canada’s commitment to freshwater stewardship, conservation, and science-based decision-making is now a national priority. There is a growing awareness that safeguarding our freshwater ecosystems is critical to the future of our economies, our communities and our quality of life. In other words, the people empowered to implement freshwater solutions are now asking for them.   The window is wide open.
 
Trusted water data underpins the goal of abundant, clean freshwater. Communities, governments, citizens and NGOs require the information to make decisions that protect Canada’s fresh water supply. Yet, water data deficiencies are widespread. One of the key findings of World Wildlife Fund’s (WWF) 2017 Watershed Report was data deficiencies on key water health metrics.
 
To address this challenge, RBC, WWF-Canada, Gordon Foundation and local community groups have been forging conservation partnerships with river communities, closing knowledge gaps around freshwater health, building capacity behind local water stewards and with the groundswell of regional commitment we are poised to help drive the most important era in Canada’s history for freshwater conservation.  Here is how: By creating a local network of users at a regional scale we are creating a true tool for evidence-based decision-making. Here’s how:

We are pairing the security of blockchain technology (decentralized ledger system) and the nimble nature of open data.  We’re making comprehensive analysis accessible and available to everyone—watershed advocates, scientists, governments, and everyday citizens—and keeping it updated through Atlantic Datastream, an online data sharing platform.  But we’re not counting on the data to speak for itself, we’re distilling and communicating our findings powerfully through WWF’s Watershed Reports.
 
Together, we’ll measure our progress in the adoption of smarter, evidence-based water conservation policies across the country. But the real measure of success will be Canada’s ability to bend the curve on our freshwater health on a national scale.

Moderators
avatar for Elizabeth Hendriks

Elizabeth Hendriks

Vice President, Fresh Water Program, WWF Canada
Elizabeth Hendriks is Vice-President of the National Freshwater Program at WWF-Canada, one of Canada’s oldest conservation organizations. She has fifteen years’ experience working internationally and nationally on water policy and in 2017, she led the release of the first national... Read More →

Speakers
avatar for Angela Douglas

Angela Douglas

Project Manager, PEI Watershed Alliance/Hillsborough River Association
Angela has twelve years' experience working with environmental groups in Atlantic Canada. She completed a MSc at UPEI while working for the Hillsborough River Association and Pisquid watershed group. She is also the executive director of the Coalition-SGSL and project manager for... Read More →
avatar for Carolyn Dubois

Carolyn Dubois

Director of the Water Program, The Gordon Foundation
Carolyn DuBois is the Director of the Water Program at The Gordon Foundation. In this role, she has worked with partners across sectors to improve freshwater stewardship through citizen engagement and the use of the best available evidence. Carolyn is a passionate advocate for open... Read More →
avatar for Emma Wattie

Emma Wattie

Director, Atlantic Water Network, Saint Mary's University
Emma Wattie is the director of Atlantic Water Network, and has been working with Community-BasedMonitoring Organizations for the last four years. As a proud Maritimer, she’s thrilled for the opportunityto work in Atlantic Canada and empower local community-based monitoring programs... Read More →


Thursday November 8, 2018 3:30pm - 4:15pm
Delta Ottawa - Chaudière

3:30pm

(90 min) Science Fact or Science Fiction? How can science be heard in an age of misinformation? / Mythe ou réalité scientifique? De quelle façon la science peut-elle être entendue dans cet ère de désinformation?
Organized by: David Johnson Research + Technology Park, University of Waterloo

Whether its climate change skepticism, falling vaccination rates, or the public pressure to shape policy that contravenes research findings, scientific information in all arenas struggles against waves of misinformation and disinformation that confirm our biases and reinforce the stories we want to tell ourselves about the world and how it works. As journalist Elfa Ýr Gylfadóttir noted in 2017, “It has even been said that, despite the easy access to knowledge, we as a human kind, are now living in the era of misinformation or disinformation.” (https://njc.dk/article/the-challenge-in-an-era-of-misinformation-and-disinformation/)

This isn't a new phenomenon – indeed the communication challenges facing science have deep historical roots – however, the rapid acceleration of digital technologies has given rise to a plurality of powerful, non-traditional voices who handily circumvent the gatekeeping and agenda setting functions of traditional institutions and outlets, planting the seeds of skepticism, mistrust and confusion. Meanwhile traditional information outlets continue to find themselves increasingly short on the time and resources necessary to fully investigate these stories, widening the gap between the general public and trusted, evidence-based information. This panel brings together experts from industry, academia, and media to discuss the historical challenges of communication and story-telling facing science and to explore how we can work together to create a stronger public discourse built on sound, evidence-based information to re-establish public trust and develop better policies. We’ll explore the historical challenges of scientific communications and how those are rapidly evolving in the digital era; how institutions, government, and industry and respond and leverage these emerging technologies to share information; and attempt to examine how we can work together to approach science communication at a broader policy level.


Moderators
avatar for Mike Pereira

Mike Pereira

Manager, David Johnston Research + Technology Park, University of Waterloo
Mike Pereira is the Manager of the David Johnston Research + Technology Park at the University of Waterloo. Over the past ten years Mike has developed expertise in marketing, communications, and partnerships, working with organizations ranging from global enterprise to tech startups... Read More →

Speakers
avatar for Rita Celli

Rita Celli

Host of Ontario Today, CBC Radio One
Rita Celli is host of the province-wide radio phone-in show Ontario Today, airing weekdays at noon on CBC Radio One. During her tenure, the show has earned a number of awards including three Gracie Awards for Outstanding Talk Show (2013, 2011, 2010), a Gabriel Award (2011), the RTNDA... Read More →
avatar for Dr. Erika Dyck

Dr. Erika Dyck

Professor, Department of History; Canada Research Chair in History of Medicine, University of Saskatchewan
Erika Dyck is a Professor at the University of Saskatchewan, and a Tier 2 Canada Research Chair in the History of Medicine. She is the author of Psychedelic Psychiatry: LSD from Clinic to Campus (Johns Hopkins, 2008; University of Manitoba Press, 2011), Facing Eugenics: Reproduction... Read More →
avatar for Conway Fraser

Conway Fraser

Managing Director, Fraser Torosay
Conway Fraser is the Managing Director of Fraser Torosay, a strategic communications company based in Waterloo. He helps companies, organizations and leaders tell their stories clearly and persuasively. Conway has almost 30 years’ experience as a professional communicator and is... Read More →
avatar for Dr. Heather MacDougall

Dr. Heather MacDougall

Associate Professor, University of Waterloo
Heather teaches at the University of Waterloo, specializing in Canadian history and the  history of medicine, public health and health policy. Since publishing Activists & Advocates: Toronto's Health Department, 1883-1983 (Toronto, 1990), she has continued to research the history... Read More →


Thursday November 8, 2018 3:30pm - 5:00pm
Delta Ottawa, International Ballroom

3:30pm

(90 min) Policy Considerations on the Convergence of High Performance Computing & Artificial Intelligence
Organized by: Compute Ontario 

High Performance Computing (HPC) and Artificial Intelligence (AI) have emerged as fundamental tools for 21st Century research. The Federal government announced as part of its 2018 Budget, a commitment of $572.5 million over five years with $52 million per year ongoing to implement a national Digital Research Infrastructure Strategy; reinforcing this point.

Using points of evidence from Compute Ontario’s Highly Qualified Personnel and Technology Investment Studies, this panel will examine how the process of conducting collaborative evidence-based planning with others in the digital research space:
  • Led to the creation of a converged high-performance computing & artificial intelligence platform which will facilitate new tools, skills development and opportunities for researchers and industry partners
  • Identified a significant gap and need for a robust academic-industry collaboration strategy in high performance computing and some of the anticipated challenges 
  • Reinforced the need to change how we measure value and evaluate return on in digital research infrastructure investments to policy makers
  • And considers ways in which regional organization can collaborate to improve coordination and investments in digital research infrastructure to accelerate national planning strategies
This panel will draw on the expertise skill and experience of senior executives from Compute Ontario, Calcul Quebec and Vector Institute.

Moderators
avatar for Nizar Ladak

Nizar Ladak

President & Chief Executive Officer, Compute Ontario
Nizar Ladak, President & CEO of Compute Ontario is a seasoned executive with 25 years of experience in Federal and Provincial Government agencies and hospitals.  His passion is finding innovative solutions to operational problems, mentoring teams and volunteering his time in non-profit... Read More →

Speakers
avatar for Chris Loken, PhD

Chris Loken, PhD

Chief Technology Officer, Compute Ontario
Dr. Loken brings more than two decades of experience in technology and specifically, within high performance computing.  For the past 16 years, Dr. Loken has held progressively senior roles at the University of Toronto, most recently as the Chief Technology Officer at SciNet.Prior... Read More →
avatar for Suzanne Talon, PhD

Suzanne Talon, PhD

Chief Executive Officer, Calcul Québec
Suzanne Talon has been CEO of Calcul Québec since September 2017, prior to this she held the position of interim CEO for 18 months. She has played a leading role in the creation of the organization which brings together the strengths of all post-secondary institutions in Quebec in... Read More →
avatar for Alison Paprica, PhD PMP

Alison Paprica, PhD PMP

Vice President, Health Strategy and Partnerships, Vector Institute; Assistant Professor, Institute for Health Policy, Management and Evaluation (IHPME)
As Vice President, Health Strategy and Partnerships, Alison Paprica is the Vector Institute’s corporate lead for health strategy, overseeing health research collaborations, health data partnerships and health AI application projects. Prior to joining Vector in November 2017, Alison's... Read More →
avatar for Alain Veilleux

Alain Veilleux

Chief Technology Officer, Calcul Québec
Alain has been involved in computing for over 35 years, both as a leisure  starting even before the advent of the IBM PC, and then professionally as a  systems administrator.  He founded the Centre for Computational Science  (CCS) at the Université de Sherbrooke in 2002.The CCS... Read More →


Thursday November 8, 2018 3:30pm - 5:00pm
Delta Hotel - Richelieu

3:30pm

(90 min) Governance of research: how can next generation scientists get involved? - Gouvernance de la recherche : quelles formes peut prendre l’implication de la relève?
Organized by: Fonds de recherche du Québec, Madison Rilling

Science’s next generation of researchers, embodied by graduate students and postdoctoral fellows, generates a significant share of scientific output in Canada and contributes to its growth and democratization. More and more, these emerging scientists are getting involved and mobilizing themselves to influence the decision-making processes within the various spheres of the research ecosystem. Taking into account the perspectives of the next generation of scientists ensures that the decisions made reflect their needs and values, and fosters the involvement of student researchers in decision-making and institutional governance. In Canada, this involvement can take many forms, e.g., advisory committees, advocacy groups or representation positions in governance structures. The proposed panel aims to present the various forms of involvement or influence that students can have, namely by putting the spotlight on three concrete examples and their impact: 1) The intersectoral student committee (Comité intersectoriel étudiant - CIÉ) of the Fonds de recherche du Québec (FRQ); 2) Science & Policy Exchange (SPE) and; 3) Science Outside the Lab North (SOtL). These examples will be complemented by the presence of an experienced researcher now working in a federal department. This generational junction aims to highlight the positive repercussions of the involvement of the next generation, for both organizations and students.

The CIÉ advises the Quebec’s Chief Scientist and is mandated to identify strategies to promote access to funding for graduate studies, foster excellence of student research, and contribute to the local and international promotion of research stemming from Quebec. Since 2014, the CIÉ has been actively contributing to integrating student researchers within the governance structure of the FRQ. Based in Montreal, SPE is a non-profit organization whose mission is to bridge the gap between academia, industry and government to inspire evidence-based policymaking. SPE led the #Students4theReport campaign to support the Naylor Report's recommendations for federal reinvestment in fundamental research. The SOtL North organization aims to provide immersion training to students related to issues that affect science, politics and society. In addition to the representatives of these three organizations, the panel will be supplemented by Donna Kirkwood, Chief Scientist at Natural Resources Canada, having herself been involved in and a witness to the training of students during graduate studies. Her experience in both academia and government will provide discussions on the importance of the contribution of the next generation in the development of research in Canada.

+++++

La relève en recherche, incarnée par les étudiant.es de cycles supérieurs et les postdoctorant.es, génère une part importante de la production scientifique au Canada en plus de contribuer à son rayonnement et à sa démocratisation. De plus en plus, la relève s’implique et se mobilise pour influencer les processus décisionnels dans les différentes sphères de l’écosystème de la recherche. La prise en compte des points de vue de la prochaine génération de scientifiques assure que les décisions prises reflètent leurs besoins et les valeurs en plus de favoriser le développement de l’expérience des jeunes quant aux mécanismes décisionnels et à la gouvernance des institutions. Au Canada, l’engagement de la relève scientifique peut prendre plusieurs formes, notamments celles de comités consultatifs, groupes de pression ou représentation étudiante dans les instances. Le panel proposé vise à présenter la diversité des modèles d’engagement ou d’influence de la relève et à exposer par trois exemples concrets les impacts positifs et multiples de leur implication active : 1) Le Comité intersectoriel étudiant (CIÉ) des Fonds de recherche du Québec; 2) Dialogue Sciences et Politique - Science & Policy Exchange (SPE) et; 3) Science Outside the Lab North (SOtL). Ces exemples seront complémentés par la présence d’une chercheuse d’expérience oeuvrant maintenant au sein d’un ministère fédéral. Cette jonction générationnelle vise à mettre en valeur les retombées positives de l’implication de la relève, tant pour les organismes que pour les étudiant.es.
 
Le CIÉ conseille le scientifique en chef du Québec et a pour mandat d’identifier des stratégies afin de promouvoir l’accessibilité au financement aux études supérieures, de favoriser l’excellence de la relève de et contribuer au rayonnement de la recherche. Depuis 2014, le CIÉ contribue activement à l’intégration des considérations de la relève dans la gouvernance de la recherche au Québec. Basée à Montréal, SPE est une organisation à but non lucratif dont la mission est de combler le fossé entre le milieu universitaire, l’industrie et le gouvernement pour inspirer l’élaboration de politiques fondées sur des données probantes. SPE a mené la campagne #Students4theReport qui visait à appuyer les recommandations du rapport Naylor pour un réinvestissement fédéral en recherche fondamentale. L’organisation SOtL North vise à offrir une formation d’immersion aux étudiantes et étudiants en lien avec des enjeux qui touchent la science, les politiques et la société. En plus de la présence des représentants de ces trois organisations, le panel sera complété par Donna Kirkwood, scientifique en chef à Ressources naturelles Canada, qui témoignera de l’importance de la contribution de la relève dans le développement de la recherche au Canada, ayant elle-même été témoin de premier plan dans la formation en recherche d’étudiantes-chercheuses et étudiants-chercheurs.


Moderators
avatar for Paul Dufour

Paul Dufour

Fellow and Adjunct Professor, Institute for Science, Society and Policy in the University of Ottawa
Paul Dufour is a Fellow and Adjunct Professor at the Institute for Science, Society and Policy in the University of Ottawa and science policy Principal with PaulicyWorks in Gatineau, Québec. He is on the Board of Directors of the graduate student led Science Policy Exchange based... Read More →

Speakers
avatar for Blake Freier

Blake Freier

PhD Student, University of Waterloo
Blake Freier is a PhD student in the philosophy department at the University of Waterloo. His interest is in socially relevant philosophy of science, particularly as it relates to evidence-based decision making in democracies. Specifically, Blake’s research looks at the nature of... Read More →
avatar for Tina Gruosso

Tina Gruosso

Postdoctoral Fellow, Goodman Cancer Research Center, McGill University
Tina completed her PhD in oncology at the Institut Curie in Paris. In 2013, she joined the Goodman Cancer Research Center at McGill University in Montreal as a postdoctoral fellow where she studies how the breast tumor microenvironment influences patient response to therapy. Tina... Read More →
avatar for Dr. Donna Kirkwood

Dr. Donna Kirkwood

Chief Scientist, Natural Resources Canada
As Chief Scientist for Natural Resources Canada, Donna plays a leadership role on developing, advancing and promoting the department’s overarching S&T priorities as aligned with the Government’s Science and Innovation agenda. To this end, Donna Kirkwood works closely with NRCan’s... Read More →
avatar for Madison Rilling

Madison Rilling

PhD Student, Université Laval
Madison Rilling is a PhD student in Physics at Université Laval. Working mid-way between the lab and the clinic, she applies optical design to medical physics to improve cancer treatments in external beam radiotherapy. Since 2016, Madison has been Vice-President of the Fonds de recherche... Read More →


Thursday November 8, 2018 3:30pm - 5:00pm
Delta Ottawa - Capitale

4:15pm

(45 min) Federal-Provincial Coordination in Research and Innovation Funding / Coordination fédérale-provinciale en financement de la recherche et de l'innovation
Organized by: University of Toronto, Emina Veletanlic and Creso Sá, PhD 

Canada’s research enterprise crosses federal-provincial borders. Provincial and federal agencies together fund over 30% of R&D activities in higher education across the country (Statistics Canada, 2017). However, federal-provincial coordination in this area has been largely a “reactive” and “ad hoc activity without a clear organizational structure or mechanism to support it” (M. Tamtik in Science and Public Policy, 2016). This panel will clarify areas of stress as well as opportunities for improvement in policy coordination.

BACKGROUND:
Historically, the federal and provincial governments have both wielded significant influence on research and innovation funding, but intergovernmental cooperation has been described as weak. This has resulted in a patchwork of programs and co-matching requirements at different levels of governments targeting the same communities with incentives that have conceptual and structural similarities. Researchers navigate a complex system of funding streams, seeking opportunities to help shoulder the costs of research.  

These issues are at the forefront in current policy debates. The 2016 Fundamental Science Review recognized that research supports are “an area where close cooperation and shared planning would make sense, but that is not what the Panel found” (p. 67).  A recent Council of Canadian Academies report highlighted this coordination gap as “both a risk and opportunity”, particularly for provincial governments (Science Policy: Considerations for Subnational Governments, 2017). Although the expert committee cautions against the risks associated with weak policy implementation, there are significant benefits to be derived from a closer connection between provincial and federal programs—if successfully translated into practice.

In light of the creation of the Canada Research Coordinating Committee (CRCC) to harmonize activities horizontally across the main federal agencies, mechanisms for vertical coordination with the provinces and territories must also be examined.

FORMAT:
Our proposed panel will spark new thinking about the coordination challenge and means to overcome the vertical coordination gap that has been endemic in Canada. Our Panel will harness the collective thinking of our expert panel and the CSPC participants to address questions such as:
  • How can past examples of federal-provincial initiatives inform the present? 
  • What are potential models for intergovernmental coordination? 
  • How can the federal research councils work with their provincial/territorial counterparts to avoid policy duplication and inconsistencies in research support programs?
  • What could be some short- and long-term coordination targets? What is success?

The following Green Paper will be discussed: https://www.impactcentre.ca/research/a-delicate-balance/  

Moderators
avatar for Dr. Creso Sá

Dr. Creso Sá

Professor of Higher Education and Director, CIHE-OISE, University of Toronto
Professor Creso Sá is Professor of Higher Education and the Director of the Centre for the Study of Canadian and International Higher education (CIHE) at the University of Toronto. He is an expert in science and technology policy, the evolving role of universities in the economy... Read More →
avatar for Emina Veletanlic

Emina Veletanlic

University of Toronto, PhD Student, CIHE-OISE; Manager, Strategic Initiatives, Impact Centre
Emina Veletanlic is a PhD student at the Centre for the Study of Canadian and International Higher Education at the University of Toronto. Her research interests include science policy, research funding strategies, emerging scientific fields, and university-industry partnerships... Read More →

Speakers
avatar for Dr. Marc Fortin

Dr. Marc Fortin

Vice-President, Research and Partnerships, Natural Sciences and Engineering Research Council of Canada
Marc Fortin is Vice-President of Research Partnerships at the Natural Sciences and Engineering ResearchCouncil of Canada (NSERC). Dr Fortin is responsible for several programs designed to stimulate researchpartnerships, innovation and the training of the generation of research and... Read More →
avatar for Dr. David Moorman

Dr. David Moorman

Senior Advisor, Policy & Planning, Canada Foundation for Innovation
Dr. David Moorman is the Canada Foundation for Innovation’s Senior Advisor for Policy and Planning. As the Senior Advisor, Dr. Moorman assists with the development and planning of new research infrastructure support programs and related policies. Dr. Moorman is specifically responsible... Read More →
avatar for Dr. Merli Tamtik

Dr. Merli Tamtik

Assistant Professor, Department of Educational Administration, Foundations and Psychology, Faculty of Education, University of Manitoba
Dr. Merli Tamtik is an Assistant Professor in Educational Administration in the Faculty of Education, University of Manitoba. Her main research focus is in policy coordination in multi-level governance systems focusing on innovation, research and international education policy. She... Read More →


Thursday November 8, 2018 4:15pm - 5:00pm
Delta Hotel - Joliet-Frontenac

4:15pm

(45 min) What's on the menu? Science-based: policies to address new agri-food realities / Que faut-il prévoir? Politiques fondées sur la science pour faire face aux nouvelles réalités agroalimentaires
Organized by:  University of Guleph,  Malcolm Campbell

Canadian food systems are likely to look a lot different in the not-too-distant future. Insect-based flour, ingredients from food waste, foodstuffs from tailored crops and livestock, in vitro meat, novel fruits and vegetables, antibiotic-free meats, and cage-free eggs are poised to factor in Canadian diets. In some instances, science-based policy is in place to support the regulation and promotion of next-generation value chains and the uptake of these foods into our kitchens. In other instances, science-based policy is lagging, or is being thwarted by factors other than science. This panel will consider emerging food system trends, and whether policy is prepared to deal with these trends. Gaps in science or policy to address food trends will be considered, and suggestions made to address these gaps.

The panel will consider how innovations in the agri-food sector can enable Canada to lead as a producer of safe, healthy, nutritious, and sustainable food - and the policy challenges associated with this immense opportunity. The panel will be moderated by Professor Malcolm Campbell, Vice-President Research from the University of Guelph, who will open the session with a short, high-level overview. Four panelists will follow with more detailed examination of the opportunities and challenges ahead: (1)  Professor Mary Buhr, Dean of University of Saskatchewan's College of Agriculture and Bioresources will discuss the role of emerging on-farm trends and technologies that are impacting global food supply chains; (2) Professor of Food Science Maria Corradini, from the University of Massachusetts, will talk about how novel packaging and other food science innovations can reduce waste and improve health and sustainability; (3) Dr. Bettina Hamelin, President and CEO of Ontario Genomics will discuss emerging new genome-based technologies such as genomic selection and synthetic biology; and (4) Canadian Agri-Food Policy Institute board member, and former Ontario Ministry of Agriculture Food and Rural Affairs Deputy Minister, Dr. Deb Stark will provide insights into policy hurdles and opportunities that could hinder or promote adoption of innovation into our food systems. The panel will then participate in an open discussion with the audience on this subject.



Moderators
avatar for Dr. Malcolm Campbell

Dr. Malcolm Campbell

Vice-President of Research, University of Guelph
Dr. Malcolm Campbell joined the University of Guelph as Vice-President, Research in June 2015. A distinguished scholar and accomplished plant genome biologist, Campbell has more than 60 peer-reviewed papers, serves on journal editorial boards, scientific and non-scientific advisory... Read More →

Speakers
avatar for Professor Mary Buhr

Professor Mary Buhr

Dean and Professor, College of Agriculture and Bioresources, University of Saskatchewan
Dr Buhr completed her PhD in Reproductive Biology from the University of Waterloo in 1982, and worked at Agriculture Canada and the University of Manitoba before joining the Ontario Agricultural College, University of Guelph in 1988. Buhr served as Associate Dean (Academic) and then... Read More →
avatar for Professor Maria Corradini

Professor Maria Corradini

Professor of Food Science, University of Massachusetts
Maria G. Corradini received a MSc and PhD, under the mentorship of Dr. Micha Peleg, from the Department of Food Science, University of Massachusetts - Amherst. In 2016, she joined the Department of Food Science at University of Massachusetts – Amherst as an Assistant Professor until... Read More →
avatar for Dr. Bettina Hamelin

Dr. Bettina Hamelin

President & CEO, Ontario Genomics
Bettina has more than 15 years of international experience in the pharmaceutical industry as well as 10 years of experience as a tenured professor at the Faculty of Pharmacy at Université Laval. Prior to assuming her current role as President and CEO of Ontario Genomics, Bettina... Read More →
avatar for Dr. Deb Stark

Dr. Deb Stark

Former Deputy Minister of Ontario Ministry of Agriculture, Food, and Rural Affairs; board member, Canadian Agri-Food Policy Institute
Deb is the former Deputy Minister of the Ontario Ministry of Agriculture, Food and Rural Affairs (OMAFRA). During her public service career, she held various senior leadership roles within OMAFRA and the Ministry of the Environment (MOE) including serving as Ontario's first chief... Read More →


Thursday November 8, 2018 4:15pm - 5:00pm
Delta Ottawa - Chaudière

5:30pm

Reception and Gala Dinner
Thursday November 8, 2018 5:30pm - 9:00pm
The Canadian Museum of History 100 Laurier St, Gatineau

9:00pm

Post-Gala Reception - Hosted by Bayer
Thursday November 8, 2018 9:00pm - 10:30pm
The Canadian Museum of History 100 Laurier St, Gatineau
 
Friday, November 9
 

7:45am

Breakfast Session - Waterloo’s Innovation Advantage - The University of Waterloo Innovation Ecosystem - Sponsored by the Institute for Quantum Computing
Innovation has been a driving force at the University of Waterloo and has been an integral part of the university’s success in research, entrepreneurship and experiential learning. The University of Waterloo was recently named as Canada’s most innovative university by Maclean’s magazine – recognition awarded to UW for the 27th year running.

Waterloo’s unique innovation ecosystem is distinguished by its inventor-owned IP policy, entrepreneurship programs, business incubators and robust industry partnerships.  From research to product idea to creation to commercialization, the University of Waterloo ecosystem provides the knowledge, tools, space and network to support start-ups and entrepreneurs on their road to commercial success.


Moderators
RL

Robert Lemieux

Dean of Science, University of Waterloo

Speakers
EB

Eric Blondeel

CTO and Co-founder, ExVivo Labs
KB

Kristine Boone

Institute for Quantum Computing, University of Waterloo and Researcher, Quantum Benchmark
AC

Adrien Côté

Science Lead and Business Advisory, UW Velocity
AR

Alexa Roeper

CEO and Co-founder, Penta Medical


Friday November 9, 2018 7:45am - 8:30am
Delta Ottawa, International Ballroom

8:15am

(45 min) How Canada Can Create a Sustainable National Space Infrastructure / De quelle façon le Canada peut-il créer une infrastructure spatiale nationale qui soit durable?
Organized by: Space Advisory Board, Michelle Mendes

Canada is known for its high-quality talent in space science and technology and has made many contributions to international initiatives past and present, such as James Webb Telescope, MOST, RADARSAT, the Canada Arm and many more. In order to continue Canada's national space legacy and to participate in future international space projects, a policy must be developed to tolerate a highly competitive, dynamic and changing global environment.

The Canadian Space sector is at a crossroads. Without immediate action, the consequences are dire. At minimum the status quo will lead to a reduction on ability to translate innovation and science into economic development, the exit of highly trained Canadians, loss of access to space activities with international partners, and limited information and data needed to sustain the activities of many Canadians sectors, such as agriculture, environmental management, health and others.

The moderator and the panellists will discuss Canadian space policy to provide a baseline for understanding the existing environment. The panel will then review and analyze recent national directives, made by other nations such as the United Kingdom, the USA, India and others. They will then demonstrate how relatively minor changes can make a significant impact on the future of Canadian space. Furthermore, a discussion about making space a national strategic asset is critical to a long-term plan for the national space sector.


Moderators
avatar for Dr. David Kendall

Dr. David Kendall

Past Chair of the United Nations Committee on the Peaceful Uses of Outer Space (2016-2017)
Dr. Kendall is the past Chair of the United Nations Committee on the Peaceful Uses of Outer Space (2016-2017).  During his career he has held senior positions with the Canadian Space Agency including as the Director General of Space Science and Space Science and Technology. He is... Read More →

Speakers
avatar for Kate Howells

Kate Howells

Global Community Outreach Manager and National Coordinator for Canada, The Planetary Society
Kate Howells works with The Planetary Society as Global Community Outreach Manager and National Coordinator for Canada. She organizes educational outreach activities via a global network of volunteers, manages the development of a youth education program, and is growing the Society's... Read More →
avatar for Dr. Gordon Osinski

Dr. Gordon Osinski

NSERC/MacDonald, Detwiller and Associates Ltd/Canadian Space Agency Industrial Research Chair in Planetary Geology, Western University
Dr.  Osinski is the NSERC/MacDonald, Detwiller and Associates Ltd/Canadian Space Agency Industrial Research Chair in Planetary Geology in the Departments of Earth Sciences and Physics and Astronomy at Western University in Ontario, Canada. His research focuses on understanding impact... Read More →
avatar for Dr. Michael Pley

Dr. Michael Pley

President, Pley Consulting Inc.
Michael Pley retired as CEO of COM DEV International in 2016 after a 30-year career,  and is currently supporting technology SMEs and space companies through his management consulting company. COM DEV was one of the leading suppliers to satellite manufacturers and space agencies... Read More →
avatar for Dr. Marie Lucy Stojak

Dr. Marie Lucy Stojak

Executive Director, Mosaic
Dr. Marie Lucy Stojak is the Executive Director of Mosaic, the Creativity & Innovation Hub at HEC Montréal, Canada's oldest business school. She has directed the Space Studies Program of the International Space University and has over 20 years’ experience in developing international... Read More →


Friday November 9, 2018 8:15am - 9:00am
Delta Ottawa, International Ballroom

8:30am

Short Talk Series
The 'Short Talks' series will include seven, 10-minute presentations, including:

1. Conspiring Together for Good: Institutional Science and Religion - Milton Friesen, Social Cities - Cardus
2. From Artificial Intelligence to Policy-Making: Changing how we make maps to make better decisions - Karen Bronsard, Centre of Expertise in Geomatics at Canada Centre for Mapping and Earth Observation, Natural Resources Canada
3. Amplify: Managing Microaggressions and Countering Stereotypes Against Women and Girls in STEM - Ana Sofia Barrows, Ryerson University and Ontario Science Centre
4. Putting our Minds Together: Research and Knowledge Management Strategy - Dr. Nicolette McGuire, BC Ministry of Health
5. From crisis to confidence: Building science and policy “bridges” in Canada’s national blood system - Dr. Dana Devine, Canadian Blood Services
6. How a new model of journalism is connecting science and the public - Lisa Varano
7. Mapping the science writing and communication landscape in Canada using new media and traditional survey research tools - Tim Lougheed, Science Writers and Communicators of Canada and Alexandre Schiele, UQAM Interuniversity Research Center on Science and Technology (IRCST)

Speakers
avatar for Ana Sofia Barrows

Ana Sofia Barrows

Social Media Manager, Lina Duque Consulting
Ana Sofia Barrows is the Social Media Manager at Lina Duque Consulting. She has worked as the Co-Program Director for SHAD at Ryerson University. She graduated from Ryerson University with a BSc (Hons) in Medical Physics and is currently working towards her Canadian Certified Inclusion... Read More →
avatar for Karen Bronsard

Karen Bronsard

Policy Analyst, Centre of Expertise in Geomatics at Canada Centre for Mapping and Earth Observation, Natural Resources Canada
Karen Bronsard is a Policy Analyst at the Canada Centre for Mapping and Earth Observation (Natural Resources Canada). She primarily works to bridge the gap between operations and policy, allowing people on both sides to understand each other. Specifically, she is interested in promoting... Read More →
avatar for Dr. Dana Devine

Dr. Dana Devine

Chief Scientist, Canadian Blood Services
Dr. Dana Devine was chief medical and scientific officer, leading the medical services and innovationdivision at Canadian Blood Services from 2001 to 2017. This included responsibility for transfusionmedicine, donor and transplantation services, emerging pathogens and infectious diseases... Read More →
avatar for Milton Friesen

Milton Friesen

Program Director, Cardus Social Cities
Milton Friesen is Program Director of Cardus Social Cities.Core ideas that orient a significant amount of my work include the exploration of complexity science by means of various network approaches. Network dynamics are a persistent feature of our human interactions including the... Read More →
avatar for Tim Lougheed

Tim Lougheed

Science Writers and Communicators of Canada
A full time freelance writer and editor since 1991, Tim Lougheed has written hundreds of articles for specialized and general publications in Canada as well as internationally. He also edits Canadian Chemical News, a magazine published by the Chemical Institute of Canada.He is the... Read More →
avatar for Dr. Nicolette McGuire

Dr. Nicolette McGuire

Director, Research, Partnerships and Innovation Division, British Columbia Ministry of Health
Nicolette McGuire, BSc, PhD is Director for Research and Innovation at the Ministry of Health in British Columbia. Nicolette has held previous positions in clinical prevention, evaluation and performance measurement at the Ministry and Island Health Authority and was a visiting scholar... Read More →
avatar for Alexandre Schiele, PhD

Alexandre Schiele, PhD

Researcher, UQAM East Asia Observatory
Alexandre Schiele, Ph. D. (Communication science, Sorbonne Paris Cité, 2017) is a researcher at the UQAM East Asia Observatory and the former General Coordinator of the Observatory (2011-2016). Previously, he worked as a research assistant at the Interuniversity Research Center on... Read More →
avatar for Lisa Varano

Lisa Varano

Audience Development Editor, The Conversation Canada
Lisa Varano is an Audience Development Editor at The Conversation Canada (theconversation.com/ca), a news, analysis and commentary website reaching an audience of over one million per month.The Conversation Canada publishes articles written by academic experts, edited by journalists... Read More →


Friday November 9, 2018 8:30am - 10:00am
Delta Hotel - Richelieu

8:30am

(90 mins) Who Speaks for Science?
Great research ecosystems support public outreach.
- INVESTING IN CANADA’S FUTURE Strengthening the Foundations of Canadian Research.
In this one sentence lies an entire field of research and practice that is key to moving science forward in Canada. But most science outreach programs in this country are, by their very design, only reaching youth or “science-aware” adults.

Many of us used to be merely concerned about the large group of public who turned away from science early in their lives and now lack any inclination to engage with it. Now, flat Earthers, anti-vaxxers and climate change deniers demonstrate that a public not just disengaged from, but actively skeptical of established science, can become a political force.

Even in the face of this, we have not changed how we engage with adults to try and reach beyond our traditional, science-aware base.

This panel explores ideas and best practices to engage adults from many backgrounds and interests with science, and what these require to be sustainable. The session moves from discussion to practice with a Freestyle Social, an innovative vehicle for public consultation and engagement with current science-related issues. The ultimate goal is to answer the question, who speaks for science in Canada?

Speakers
avatar for Carrie Boyce

Carrie Boyce

Program Manager, RCIScience
Specialising in outreach and public engagement, Carrie works to promote lifelong learning, widenparticipation and champion social mobility and diversity in STEM. Carrie has enjoyed a varied career,working with the University of Cambridge, Royal Society of Chemistry and Cancer Research... Read More →
avatar for Dr. Marianne Mader

Dr. Marianne Mader

Executive Director, Canadian Association of Science Centres
Marianne is the new Executive Director for the Canadian Association of Science Centres, a member-based organization representing over 60 organizations that support the informal learning of science,technology, and nature across Canada. She is responsible for government advocacy, partnershipdevelopment... Read More →
avatar for Cara Marshall

Cara Marshall

Director of Communications, Canada’s Chief Science Advisor
Cara oversees the communications activities for the Office of the Chief Science Advisor, and advises onstrategic planning, media relations, and issues management. Prior to that, she managed sciencecommunications in the Government of Canada’s department of Innovation, Science and... Read More →
avatar for Anthony Morgan

Anthony Morgan

Broadcaster and Creative Director of Science Everywhere
To say Anthony Morgan loves science is an understatement. Though he is a neuroscientist andpsychologist by training, it was the 12 years he spent at the Ontario Science Centre that sparked hispassion for creating and sharing incredible science experiences! From here he decided to... Read More →


Friday November 9, 2018 8:30am - 10:00am
Delta Hotel - Joliet-Frontenac

8:30am

(90 min) Where the rubber meets the road: The real life impact of policy on Canadian postdocs / Les répercussions concrètes des politiques sur les boursiers canadiens
Organized by: Canadian Association of Postdoctoral Scholars, Joseph S. Sparling, PhD

This panel aims to examine the real life impact of current postdoctoral policies in Canada and to discuss potential policy reforms that could provide solutions to many of the challenges facing Canadian postdoctoral scholars today. The panel will open with two presentations by current/former postdocs affiliated with CAPS/ACSP. The first of those presentations will review the major challenges facing Canadian postdocs based on survey data and front-line stories from postdocs across the country, including issues related to employment status, compensation and benefits, immigration, career development, and personal support. The second presentation will focus on identifying the policies that contribute to those challenges and discussing potential policy-based solutions for improving the status quo for postdocs in Canada. Following the presentations a representative from the Tri-Agency and a postdoctoral administrator from a large Canadian research university will be asked to weigh in on the proposed policy reforms, identify potential barriers to those proposed changes in the current Canadian research landscape, and discuss possible ways to overcome those barriers. The panel will close following questions from the audience and a brief summary statement from the moderator. 

Moderators
avatar for Joseph S. Sparling, PhD

Joseph S. Sparling, PhD

Chair, Canadian Association of Postdoctoral Scholars
Dr. Joseph S. Sparling is the current Chair of the Canadian Association of Postdoctoral Scholars (CAPS/ACSP), the spokesperson for the Postdoctoral Associations of Alberta (the group responsible for convincing the Alberta government to grant postdocs employment status via legislation... Read More →

Speakers
avatar for Dominique Bérubé

Dominique Bérubé

Vice-President, Research Programs, Social Sciences and Humanities Research Council
Dominique Bérubé was appointed vice-president, Research Programs, at SSHRC in October 2015. Prior to joining SSHRC, Dominique worked at the Université de Montréal, beginning in 2007. There, she held a variety of positions, including acting vice-rector, Research; associate vice-rector... Read More →
avatar for Jenna Haverfield, PhD

Jenna Haverfield, PhD

Postdoctoral Scholar, McGill University and Vice-Chair Membership, Canadian Association of Postdoctoral Scholars
Dr. Jenna Haverfield is a Postdoctoral Fellow at the Research Institute of the McGill University Health Centre in Montreal, Quebec. Dr. Haverfield earned her PhD from Monash University in Melbourne, Australia, and has undertaken postdoctoral training in the UK and Canada. Dr. Haverfield... Read More →
avatar for Krishnamoorthy Hegde, PhD

Krishnamoorthy Hegde, PhD

Postdoctoral Scholar, Institut national de la recherché scientifique and At-Large Member, Canadian Association of Postdoctoral Scholars
Krishnamoorthy Hegde is a postdoctoral researcher at Institut national de la recherche scientifique (Centre Eau Terre Environnement; INRS-ETE), Québec, Canada. He holds PhD in biotechnology from Indian Institute of Technology Guwahati. He has worked in industry and academia in the... Read More →
avatar for Rachel Fernandez, PhD

Rachel Fernandez, PhD

Associate Dean, Faculty of Graduate and Postdoctoral Studies, University of British Columbia
Rachel Fernandez is a microbiologist. She has an undergraduate degree from the University of Toronto, and an MSc and PhD in Microbiology from Dalhousie University. After a four and half year postdoc first at Virginia Commonwealth University and then at the University of Cincinnati... Read More →


Friday November 9, 2018 8:30am - 10:00am
Delta Ottawa - Capitale

8:30am

(90 minute) Skills-building and impact in the social sciences and humanities
Organized by: Research Impact Canada, the Conference Board and The Collaboration, SSHRC

Research Impact Canada, the Conference Board have partnered with The Collaborative, a SSHRC funded network dedicated to helping educators foster a better culture around SSH knowledge and skills to offer a new collaborative platform for educators in K12 through PSE. The premise of the project is that students, graduates, researchers, and educators in SSH disciplines benefit from applied skills training, cross-sectoral collaborations, and knowledge sharing. Likewise, collaboration and knowledge sharing skills help extend the reach, engagement, and impact of SSH research and activities. But the models of impact available do not do justice to the nature and diversity of activities in which engagement and knowledge mobilization objectives can be achieved. This panel will offer draw upon the expertise of the speakers and to identify best practices, resources, and next steps for improving our understanding of impact in the social sciences.


Speakers
avatar for Dr. Sandra Lapointe

Dr. Sandra Lapointe

Associate Professor, Philosophy, McMaster University
Dr. Sandra Lapointe joined the Philosophy Department at McMaster University in 2011 as Associate Professor. A Commonwealth alumna and a Fellow of the Humboldt Foundation, she is a Research Affiliate of the Bertrand Russell Research Centre and currently Director, Associations at the... Read More →
avatar for Dr. Matthew McKean

Dr. Matthew McKean

Director, Education, Conference Board of Canada
Dr. Matthew McKean is Associate Director of Education at the Conference Board of Canada. Matthew directs the research program and leads stakeholder relations for the Centre for Skills and Post-Secondary Education, a major five-year initiative that examines the advanced skills and... Read More →
avatar for Dr. David Phipps

Dr. David Phipps

Leader of Knowledge Mobilization Unit, York University
Dr. David Phipps is Executive Director, Research & Innovation Services, Division of Vice-President Research & Innovation with York University where he manages research grants and agreements including knowledge and technology transfer for York University, including York’s award winning... Read More →


Friday November 9, 2018 8:30am - 10:00am
Delta Ottawa - Chaudière

9:15am

(45 min) Digital Futures: The Impact of Digital Threats to Democracy / Avenir numérique : les répercussions des menaces numériques sur la démocratie
Organized by: Social Sciences and Humanities Research Council, Eloisa Martinez

An interactive and forward-looking series of four lightning talks, organized by the Social Sciences and Humanities Research Council (SSHRC), will highlight several key opportunities and challenges presented by the pervasive role of Artificial Intelligence (AI) and other technologies in the daily lives of Canadian citizens within a globalized context. Speakers from across academic, public, community/not-for-profit and business sectors will explore with the audience the transformative impacts of technology related to digital threats to democracy. Following these presentations, a number of possible storylines will emerge based on the key digital trends under discussion. Audience members will be called upon to examine possible societal outcomes for a number of potential futures.

These lightening talks will frame a discussion on digital threats to democracy and the role of evidence- based policy making to address the associated risks and opportunities to democratic processes in the digital age. This session provides an excellent opportunity for cross-sectoral dialogue and insights related to policy implications on these critical issues with a view to imagining our digital futures.


Moderators
avatar for Ursula Gobel

Ursula Gobel

Associate Vice-President, Future Challenges, Social Sciences and Humanities Research Council
Ursula Gobel was appointed associate vice-president, future challenges, at SSHRC in April 2014. In her role, she collaborates with the research community and partners across the public, private and not-for-profit sectors to advance the social sciences and humanities contributions... Read More →

Speakers
avatar for Dr. Elizabeth F. Judge

Dr. Elizabeth F. Judge

Professor of Law at the Faculty of Law, University of Ottawa
Dr. Elizabeth F. Judge is Professor of Law at the Faculty of Law at the University of Ottawa, where shespecializes in intersections of law, technology, and policy.  She is a member of the Centre for Law,Technology and Society, and holds a cross appointment with the Department of... Read More →
avatar for Barrie Kirk

Barrie Kirk

Executive Director, Canadian Automated Vehicles Centre of Excellence (CAVCOE); President, Canadian Automated Vehicles Institute (CAVI)
Barrie Kirk, P.Eng. is the Executive Director of the Canadian Automated Vehicles Centre of Excellence(CAVCOE) and the President of the newly-formed industry association the Canadian Automated VehiclesInstitute (CAVI). He has worked in the technology industries in Canada, the U.S... Read More →
avatar for Norman Mendoza

Norman Mendoza

Manager of Business and Technology Innovation, City of Edmonton
Norman Mendoza is the City of Edmonton’s Manager of Business and Technology Innovation. Since joining the City, Norman has been involved in advising City leadership on ways to transforming the architecture of the City’s IT capabilities to better meet citizen needs. In his role... Read More →
avatar for Renee Sieber

Renee Sieber

Associate Professor, School of Environment & Department of Geography, McGill University
R. E. Sieber researches the use and value of information and communications technologies by marginalized communities, community based organizations, and social movement groups. Her current work concentrates on the potential use of geospatial machine learning algorithms and AI for... Read More →


Friday November 9, 2018 9:15am - 10:00am
Delta Ottawa, International Ballroom

10:30am

Science and the next generation: partnerships and collaborative infrastructure as enablers
Recognizing the central role that science plays in many aspects of Canadian society, the federal government has developed a vision to foster a culture of evidence-based policy- and decision-making. This new vision will lead to enhanced science outcomes for Canadians through greater collaboration and improved infrastructure that will benefit the wider Canadian science ecosystem. Areas of focus include strengthened equity and diversity in science, support for the next generation of scholars, scientists being equipped with the tools and resources they need to succeed, and active engagement in the rapidly evolving global science landscape.

The panel discussion will focus on how scientific research can address today’s emerging challenges through new collaboration, supported by innovative and world class science infrastructure. Members will highlight successes with respect to collaboration across jurisdictions to address important scientific questions, how the pace of discovery and innovation is shaping their workplaces and influencing the tools they need, and how they are keeping pace with transformative changes in the global scientific landscape.


Moderators
avatar for Dr. Mona Nemer

Dr. Mona Nemer

Chief Science Advisor, Government of Canada
Dr. Mona Nemer is the Chief Science Advisor to Canada’s Prime Minister and Minister of Science. Her mandate is to provide advice on issues related to science and government policies that support it. This includes advising on ways to ensure that science is considered in policy decisions... Read More →

Speakers
avatar for Dr. David Castle

Dr. David Castle

Vice-President Research and a Professor in the School of Public Administration with an adjunct appointment in the Gustavson School of Business
Dr. David Castle is Vice-President Research and a Professor in the School of Public Administration with an adjunct appointment in the Gustavson School of Business. His research focuses on social aspects of life science innovation including science policy, democratic engagement, regulation... Read More →
avatar for Dr. Martha Crago

Dr. Martha Crago

Vice-Principal, Research and Innovation, McGill University
Professor Martha Crago is McGill University’s Vice-Principal (Research and Innovation). Prior to returning to McGill, she was the Vice-President (Research) at Dalhousie University. Her previous university administrative positions include Vice-President of International and Inter-Governmental... Read More →
avatar for Dr. Stacey Robinson

Dr. Stacey Robinson

Research Scientist at Environment and Climate Change Canada; Adjunct Professor at Carleton University
Dr. Stacey Robinson is a Research Scientist at Environment and Climate Change Canada andan Adjunct Professor at Carleton University. She is located at the National Wildlife ResearchCentre which is attached to the Department of Biology at Carleton University. Her researchcontributes... Read More →
avatar for Dr. Dan Wicklum

Dr. Dan Wicklum

Chief Executive, Canada’s Oil Sands Innovation Alliance (COSIA)
Dan Wickum has been Chief Executive of Canada’s Oil Sands Innovation Alliance (COSIA) since itsinception in 2012. Under his leadership, COSIA has become a globally unique catalyst for collaborationand innovation, with a billion-dollar portfolio of projects delivering on a mandate... Read More →


Friday November 9, 2018 10:30am - 12:00pm
Delta Ottawa, International Ballroom

12:00pm

1:00pm

Brainstorming for Canada’s National Water Vision / Réflexion sur la vision nationale de l'eau au Canada
Organized by: Pacific Water Research Centre and Ryerson University Water, Nick Reid and Zafar Adeel

Co-led by the Pacific Water Research Centre and Ryerson Urban Water
Emerging water challenges in Canada can be tied to climate-change impacts on water availability, urbanization and population growth, water pollution, and threats to aquatic ecosystems. A 2017 report from the World Wildlife Fund in Canada (WWF-Canada) indicated that most of the watersheds in Canada are showing significant disruptions from human activities such as hydropower dams, discharges from agricultural and industrial activities, rapid urbanization, extensive application of road salt, and incidents involving natural resources extraction. At the same time, Canada has an unmatched, century-long history of peacefully managing shared water resources with the United States. In recent years, landmark water-sharing agreements have emerged, which engage Indigenous communities as important stakeholders. Canadian companies have developed advanced technologies for water treatment and monitoring.

Public perceptions play an important role in this respect. In a recent survey conducted by RBC, 45% of Canadians believe water is Canada’s most important natural resource and 50% believe water is an important part of Canada’s national identity. However, only 6% of Canadians say they put extra effort into saving water and only 50% of Canadians say they have an adequate understanding of the impact of climate change on water availability and quality. These findings reveal some contradictory perceptions held by the Canadian public, which value water an important natural resource, and yet demonstrate inattention to water resources under the presumption that it is an abundant resource.

One major stumbling block for Canada is that it does not have a common, ambitious and visionary national strategy to manage its water resources, unlike almost all developed countries in the world including those with similar federated constitutions. This means, for example, that no federally enforceable standards exist for safety and environmental/economic sustainability for drinking water, wastewater, stormwater and ground water extraction. Further, the absence of a national water vision has led to varied, and sometimes chequered, approaches for addressing the water management challenges in Canada, including disproportionately disadvantaged indigenous communities, an increasing water infrastructure deficit and failing to declare water as a human right. Development of a common national vision that is jointly developed through engagement of stakeholders at various jurisdictional levels is an important first step in addressing Canada’s water challenges.

In this respect, a new comprehensive framework can be used to address these interconnected water challenges in one fell swoop: The Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs) developed by the United Nations that aim to achieve significant and ambitious improvements by the year 2030. Countries across the globe, including Canada, are re-tooling their national development strategies to meet these global targets. Another pertinent development is the designation of 2018-2028 as the International Decade for Action “Water for Sustainable Development.” A pan-Canadian alliance of universities, civil society organizations, private sector leaders, and environmental groups – called the International Water Decade Alliance (IWDA) – brings together the SDG implementation with the new water decade.

This symposium will highlight the need for a national water vision in Canada and bring together experts from across Canada to begin a discussion on the opportunities and obstacles of achieving a common vision. This symposium will foster ideas, leading to actionable strategies, and steps necessary for making this visioning process a success.



Speakers
avatar for Zafar Adeel

Zafar Adeel

Professor, Resource and Environmental management at Simon Fraser University ; Executive director, Pacific Water Research Centre
Dr. Zafar Adeel serve as the Executive Director of the Pacific Water Research Centre, and as Professor of Professional Practice at the School of Resources and Environmental Management at Simon Fraser University. He has over 25 years of experience in a broad range of environmental... Read More →
avatar for Julia Baird

Julia Baird

Assistant Professor, Environmental Sustainability Research Centre at Brock University
Julia Baird is an Assistant Professor at Brock University in the Environmental Sustainability Research Centre and the Department of Geography and Tourism Studies and a Canada Research Chair in Human Dimensions of Water Resources and Water Resilience. Her research focuses on resilience... Read More →
avatar for Courtney Bridge

Courtney Bridge

Graduate Student, Simon Fraser University
Courtney Bridge completed a Bachelor of Science in Environmental Science at Nova Southeastern University. She is now pursuing a master’s degree in Resource and Environmental Management at SimonFraser University. Her research focuses on national water policy in Canada.
avatar for Ogimaa Kwe (Chief) Linda Debassige

Ogimaa Kwe (Chief) Linda Debassige

M’Chigeeng First Nation
Ms. Debassige, who graduated with honours from Confederation College’s Civil Engineering program in Thunder Bay, was born and raised in M’Chigeeng. Ms. Debassige was first elected to council in 2013 and became involved and active in a number of portfolios including the audit and... Read More →
avatar for Mark Fisher

Mark Fisher

Chief Executive Officer, Council of the Great Lakes Region
Mark Fisher was appointed President and CEO of the Council of the Great Lakes Region by the Council’s board in 2014. Established in 2013,the Council is a bi-national nonprofit that brings decision-makers frombusiness, government, academia and the nonprofit sector together to deepen... Read More →
avatar for Elizabeth Hendriks

Elizabeth Hendriks

Vice President, Fresh Water Program, WWF Canada
Elizabeth Hendriks is Vice-President of the National Freshwater Program at WWF-Canada, one of Canada’s oldest conservation organizations. She has fifteen years’ experience working internationally and nationally on water policy and in 2017, she led the release of the first national... Read More →
avatar for Irving Leblanc

Irving Leblanc

Director, Housing, Infrastructure & Emergency Services, Assembly of First Nations
Irving Leblanc is the Director - Housing, Infrastructure, and Emergency Services at the Assembly of First Nations. His responsibility is to represent the AFN on the various initiatives and committees related to housing, infrastructure, water and sanitation, source water protection... Read More →
avatar for Merrell-Ann Phare

Merrell-Ann Phare

Executive Director, Centre for Indigenous Environmental Resources
Merrell-Ann Phare is a lawyer, writer and the founding Executive Director of the Centre for Indigenous Environmental Resources (CIER), a national First Nation charitable environmental organization. As Chief Negotiator for the Government of the Northwest Territories, Merrell-Ann lead... Read More →
avatar for Lisa A Prime

Lisa A Prime

Principal Consultant, PRIME Strategy & Planning
Lisa A Prime is the Principal of PRIME Strategy and Planning and is on the Advisory Board ofRyerson Urban Water where she contributes to research, education, policy, and think tankinitiatives and advancements. Lisa is an industry leader in sustainable community developmentand the... Read More →
avatar for Nick Reid

Nick Reid

Executive Director, Ryerson Urban Water Centre
Nick Reid is Executive Director of Ryerson Urban Water (RUW) with a focus on achieving healthy and sustainable urban water cycles through applied research, education and outreach, and supportive policy.He is a long standing member of the American Water Works Association, currently... Read More →
avatar for Francis Scarpaleggia

Francis Scarpaleggia

Member of the Canadian Parliament for Lac-Saint-Louis
Francis Scarpaleggia was First elected to the House of Commons in 2004, Francis Scarpaleggia was re-elected to Parliament in 2006, 2008, 2011 and 2015. He is the Chair of the National Liberal Caucus.Since first being elected, Francis has made the protection of Canada’s freshwater... Read More →
avatar for Larry Swatuk

Larry Swatuk

Director, Master of Development Practice (MDP), and Associate Professor, School of Environment, Enterprise and Development at the University of Waterloo
Larry Swatuk (PhD) is Professor of International Development in the School of Environment, Enterprise and Development (SEED) at the University of Waterloo, Canada. He is also Extraordinary Professor in the Institute for Water Studies, University of Western Cape, South Africa, and... Read More →
avatar for Banu Örmeci

Banu Örmeci

Professor and Jarislowsky Chair in Water and Global Health, and Canada Research Professor, Carleton University
Banu Örmeci develops technology to clear pathogens and contaminants from wastewater and sludge, so they do not pose a threat to public health and environment. She has two U.S. patents with another commercialization on its way by one of the largest multi-national companies in the... Read More →


Friday November 9, 2018 1:00pm - 4:30pm
Delta Hotel - Richelieu

1:00pm

Equity, Diversity and Inclusion in Science: from Policy to Implementation / Équité, diversité et inclusion des sciences : des politiques à la mise en oeuvre
The added value to Canadian science of embracing equity, diversity and inclusion (EDI) is increasingly being identified by policy-makers, funding organizations, the post-secondary education sector and other parts of the scientific research & development eco-system as an economic imperative. Fully leveraging the talent pool, the human capital and the diversity opportunity that exists in Canada is also a key element in developing and maintaining a stronger innovation ecosystem. Strategies designed to promote and embrace EDI in all aspects of Canadian science currently exist or are in development at various levels. For instance, the federal government, through the tri-councils, has created explicit criteria relating to EDI
expectations and requirements (particularly relating to the four designated groups under the Employment Equity Act) for a number of programs including, but not limited to, the Canada Research Chairs (CRCs) and Canada Excellence Research Chairs (CERCs) (see http://www.chairs-chaires.gc.ca/program-programme/equity-equite/index-eng.aspx).

Canadian universities, through Universities Canada, have made explicit commitments to implementing principles of EDI (https://www.univcan.ca/priorities/equity-diversity-inclusion/) although details are vague. Moreover, in the recent federal budget  (https://www.budget.gc.ca/2018/home-accueil-en.html) significant new investments in science were framed by expectations for the development of programming (e.g. AthenaSWAN, ADVANCE) that would support the implementation of policies and processes to increase and improve EDI within Canadian science. While these initiatives all speak to a commitment to embracing EDI in science, the reality is that moving from policy to implementation is currently challenged by the low levels of awareness and education around EDI theory and practice within the scientific community. There are limited interactions between the scientific community and academic EDI experts and a general lack of understanding of best practices, which, when combined with inertia and pushback from some parts of the community may limit the effective integration of EDI into Canadian science. Therefore, it is imperative that the scientific community and all stakeholders are actively engaged in the development and implementation of well-designed, data-driven, evidence-informed approaches that raise awareness, drive education, define actions and achieve measurable outcomes that integrate EDI into the scientific enterprise in Canada.

This interactive symposium will bring together experts and practitioners to lead a dialogue on the current state of our understanding of EDI in science in Canada and to provide specific actionable approaches which will help individuals, departments, divisions, faculties, research institutes, scientific societies and conferences, and others, move from policy to implementation of EDI principles.



Moderators
avatar for Dr. Imogen Coe

Dr. Imogen Coe

Professor, Chemistry and Biology, Ryerson University
Dr. Imogen R. Coe was the founding dean of the Faculty of Science at Ryerson University (2012-2018). She is a professor in the Department of Chemistry and Biology, and is also an affiliate scientist in the Li Ka Shing Knowledge Institute, Keenan Research Centre, at St. Michael’s... Read More →

Speakers
avatar for Dr. Art Blake

Dr. Art Blake

Associate Professor and ECI Faculty Chair, Ryerson University
Art Blake is Associate Professor in the Department of History, Ryerson University. He is currently seconded to Ryerson's Office of the Vice-President, Equity and Community Inclusion (OVPECI) as ECI Faculty Chair, a new pilot leadership role. The position is designed as a bridge between... Read More →
avatar for Deanna Burgart

Deanna Burgart

Self-proclaimed Indigeneer™; engineer, speaker, and mentor
Deanna Burgart P.Eng, CET is a self-proclaimed Indigeneer™; engineer, speaker, and mentor that has a talent for identifying gaps and providing solutions to systemic, organizational and transformational change. She brings over 20 years of experience and education in oil, gas, and... Read More →
avatar for Dr. Danika Goosney

Dr. Danika Goosney

Associate Vice-President, Tri-Agency Institutional Programs Secretariat
Dr. Danika Goosney is the Associate Vice-President of the Tri-Agency Institutional Programs Secretariat, housed at the Social Sciences and Humanities Research Council of Canada (SSHRC).   The Secretariat is responsible for the administration of the Canada Research Chairs Program... Read More →
avatar for Dr. Steven Murphy

Dr. Steven Murphy

President and Vice-Chancellor, University of Ontario Institute of Technology
Dr. Steven Murphy joined the University of Ontario Institute of Technology as its new President and Vice-Chancellor on March 1, 2018. He envisions the university as a bastion for alternative ways of thinking about why diversity in all forms is important. He believes experiential and... Read More →


Friday November 9, 2018 1:00pm - 4:30pm
Delta Hotel - Joliet-Frontenac

1:00pm

Policy and Funding Models for Graduate Students and Postdoctoral Fellows / Modèles de politique et de financement pour les étudiants diplômés et les boursiers postdoctoraux
Organized by: University of Toronto, Helen Lasthiokis

Doctoral students and postdoctoral fellows (PDFs) are intrinsic to the postsecondary research that results in benefits for our economy and society. The Fundamental Science Review highlighted this point but also found that, despite significant increases in graduate enrolments, the number of core graduate awards and PDF stipends as well as the amount of the awards, has not changed in more than a decade. In responding to the Review as part of Budget 2018, the federal Government noted that it would undertake work to determine how to better support this next generation of researchers through scholarships and fellowships.

An international keynote speaker and a diverse panel will discuss policy models and opportunities to reinvigorate scholarships and fellowships for graduate students and PDFs, and how the use of these awards can attract diverse talent from Canada and internationally.

Moderators
avatar for Vivek Goel

Vivek Goel

Vice President, Research and Innovation at the University of Toronto and a Professor in the Institute of Health Policy, Management and Evaluation at the Dalla Lana School of Public Health
Professor Vivek Goel is Vice President, Research and Innovation at the University of Toronto and a Professor in the Institute of Health Policy, Management and Evaluation at the Dalla Lana School of Public Health. Professor Goel is a distinguished scholar with an extensive background... Read More →

Speakers
avatar for Alejandro Adem

Alejandro Adem

Chief Executive Officer and Scientific Director, Mitacs Inc.
Alejandro Adem has been Chief Executive Officer and Scientific Director of Mitacs since February 1, 2015. He is concurrently Professor of Mathematics at the University of British Columbia.As CEO of Mitacs, Professor Adem has overseen an unprecedented expansion of its programs, with... Read More →
avatar for Dr. Martha Crago

Dr. Martha Crago

Vice-Principal, Research and Innovation, McGill University
Professor Martha Crago is McGill University’s Vice-Principal (Research and Innovation). Prior to returning to McGill, she was the Vice-President (Research) at Dalhousie University. Her previous university administrative positions include Vice-President of International and Inter-Governmental... Read More →
avatar for Bonnie Le, Ph.D.

Bonnie Le, Ph.D.

Banting Postdoctoral Fellow, Rotman School of Management at the University of Toronto
Bonnie Le is a Banting Postdoctoral Fellow at the Rotman School of Management at the University of Toronto. She received her Ph.D. in psychology from the University of Toronto, where her graduate studies were supported by a Vanier Canada Graduate Scholarship and an Ontario Trillium... Read More →
avatar for P. Kay Lund PhD.

P. Kay Lund PhD.

Director of the Division of Biomedical Research Workforce, NIH Extramural Research Training Officer in the Office of Extramural Research, Office of the Director, at the National Institutes of Health
P. Kay Lund is Director of the Division of Biomedical Research Workforce and the NIH Extramural Research Training Officer in the Office of Extramural Research, Office of the Director, at the National Institutes of Health (NIH).  Her role is to provide leadership for development... Read More →


Friday November 9, 2018 1:00pm - 4:30pm
Delta Ottawa - Capitale

1:00pm

Science Policy 101 / Politique scientifique 101
Organized by: Canadian Science Policy Centre, Jeff Kinder and Silke Nebel 

Curious about science policy? Whether trying to make a difference or demonstrating impact to funders, the
need to engage effectively with policy- makers is increasingly part of the research endeavor. But even many of the most experienced research faculty balk at the barriers to bringing their research to the decision-table. For early career researchers and graduate students, the barriers are even higher – as are the rewards.

This workshop will provide a gateway into the world of science policy. You will gain an understanding of what science policy is and how it works through an afternoon of interactive exercises and discussion. We welcome active participants from all backgrounds, whether in the sciences, engineering, public policy and
administration, business, communications, arts or something else entirely. With an interest in science policy, this workshop is the place to share and expand knowledge, develop skills, and start building a network of interesting people in the world of science policy.

Speakers
avatar for Dr. Kimberly Girling

Dr. Kimberly Girling

Policy Analyst, Innovation, Science and Economic Development Canada
Kimberly Girling holds a PhD in Neuroscience from the University of British Columbia, whereshe studied new therapeutics for Huntington's Disease, a neurodegenerative illness.  Kimberlywas a member of the inaugural cohort of the Mitacs Canadian Science Policy Fellowship.Through the fellowship, she was positioned with Defence Research and Development where sheworked to identify ethical challenges of emerging techno... Read More →
avatar for Dr. Jeff Kinder

Dr. Jeff Kinder

Executive Director, Science and Innovation Institute on Governance
Jeff has 30 years of experience in government science, technology and innovation policy in the US and Canada.  His US experience includes the National Science Foundation, the National Academies and the Naval Research Laboratory.  In Canada, Jeff has worked at Industry Canada, Natural... Read More →
avatar for Silke Nebel

Silke Nebel

VP Science and Conservation, Bird Studies Canada
Silke Nebel is the VP Science and Conservation with Bird Studies Canada, a national NGO that uses scientific research to inform conservation decisions for birds. She also runs a science communication business (‘Science to Action Consulting’). Prior to starting her own business... Read More →
avatar for Kori St-Cyr

Kori St-Cyr

Senior Advisor, Science Strategies, Canadian Institutes of Health Research
Kori St-Cyr is a science strategy and knowledge translation professional committed to working at theinterface of science, partnership development and public policy. As a Senior Advisor with CIHR, Kori provides strategic leadership and advice towards the agency’s health research... Read More →


Friday November 9, 2018 1:00pm - 4:30pm
Delta Ottawa, International Ballroom

1:00pm

Supporting Canada’s Energy Transition – Bridging the Gap between Fundamental Research, Industry, and Policy
Organized by: Queen's University

For our prosperity and well-being, Canada must build a low-carbon energy future. The pathway to this future requires political leadership informed by collaboration with various partners – including government, Indigenous peoples, researchers, and industry.

Science and innovation will be key to driving this low-carbon future. Expertise in energy sources (e.g. petroleum, natural gas, renewables, and nuclear) and policy will be critical to informing the technologies, materials, and processes that facilitate this transition.  Before this research can inform government processes and policies – and before emerging technologies can be commercialized and mobilized – efforts must be made to translate and effectively bridge the research-industry-government gap.  This is not an easy journey, filled with barriers (e.g. regulatory hurdles, training, financial resources), and much promising research gets “lost” along the way.  

Building on Natural Resources Canada’s (NRCan) Generation Energy initiative and the successful workshop (Envisioning a Competitive Low-Carbon Energy Future: The Role of Nuclear and Renewables) hosted by Queen’s University and NRCan in 2017, this symposium will explore how we can facilitate and accelerate knowledge translation and exchange (KTE) to help realize our low-carbon economy. What are the tools for KTE between these various bodies? What role can the various partners play in accelerating KTE?


Speakers
avatar for Carolyn DeLoyde

Carolyn DeLoyde

Ph.D Candidate, Geography and Planning, Queen's University
Carolyn DeLoyde’s current research focus is quantifying ecosystem services to enhance the use of natural heritage systems in response to climate change. She has been a registered professional planner and a member of the Canadian Institute of Planners since 1996. As well, she has... Read More →
avatar for Joy Romero, P.Eng, MBA PM, ICD.D, FCAE

Joy Romero, P.Eng, MBA PM, ICD.D, FCAE

Vice President Technology & Innovation, Canadian Natural Resources Limited
Joy has worked in steel, iron ore, coal and oil and gas.   She has served as a School Trustee, Chair of the Governing Council of Athabasca University, and advisor to several NSERC chairs. Joy is currently chair of the Clean Resource Innovation Network, Board Chair of Canada’s Oil... Read More →
avatar for Michael Fraser

Michael Fraser

Vice-Principal (University Relations), Queen’s University
Michael Fraser, Vice-Principal (University Relations), joined Queen’s in May 2013 after more than 20 years of experience in the public affairs and communications field, including a variety of positions in both the federal and provincial governments. He has served as a chief of staff... Read More →
avatar for Monica Gattinger

Monica Gattinger

Director, Institute for Science, Society and Policy
Monica Gattinger is Director of the Institute for Science, Society and Policy, Full Professor at the School of Political Studies and Chair of Positive Energy at the University of Ottawa. Professor Gattinger’s research and engagement focus on strengthening governance, public policy... Read More →
avatar for Dr. Praveen Jain

Dr. Praveen Jain

Professor, Canada Research Chair, Electrical and Computer Engineering, Queen’s University
Praveen Jain is the Canada Research Chair in Power Electronics and Director of the Queen's University Centre for Energy and Power Electronics Research (ePOWER). Dr. Jain holds a PhD from the University of Toronto.Jain’s research contributions have resulted in over 550 publications... Read More →
avatar for Warren Mabee

Warren Mabee

Head and Professor, Department of Geography and Planning Queen’s University
Warren Mabee (PhD 2001, University of Toronto) is head and professor in the Department of Geography and Planning at Queen’s University. He holds a Canada Research Chair (Tier 2) in Renewable Energy Development and Implementation, and is cross-appointed to the School of Policy Studies... Read More →
TN

Trevor Nightingale

Principal Research Officer for the Construction Research Centre, National Research Council
avatar for Dr. Ron Oberth

Dr. Ron Oberth

President, Organization of Canadian Nuclear Industries
Ron Oberth has worked in the Canadian nuclear industry for more than 30 years, holding positions at Ontario Hydro, Ontario Hydro International, Ontario Power Generation and the former AECL Reactor Division (now SNC-Lavalin/ Candu Energy). In June of 2011, Oberth became president and... Read More →
avatar for Laura Oleson

Laura Oleson

Director General of Energy Policy, Natural Resources Canada
Laura Oleson, Director General of the Energy Policy Branch, first joined NRCan and the Energy Sector in 2010 as the Director, Demand Policy and Analysis in the Office of Energy Efficiency where she made significant contributions to NRCan’s clean energy and climate change strategies... Read More →
avatar for Dr. Kimberly A. Woodhouse

Dr. Kimberly A. Woodhouse

Vice-Principal (Research), Queen’s University
Dr. Woodhouse is Vice-Principal (Research) and a professor in the Faculty of Engineering and Applied Science, after serving as dean of that faculty for two five-year terms from June 2007 to 2017. In addition to her academic background, Dr. Woodhouse has almost a decade of experience... Read More →


Friday November 9, 2018 1:00pm - 4:30pm
Delta Ottawa - Chaudière